Topic: SNAP

A Strengthen SNAP Agenda to Address the Hunger Cliff—Part 1

Several temporary SNAP improvements that have mitigated food hardship during the COVID-19 crisis terminate whenever that PHE ends.  A PHE termination threatens to result in a significant “hunger cliff” for millions of people. In addition to other relief that expires, most SNAP participants will lose $82 a month in SNAP benefits.

This two-part blog summarizes the array of SNAP aid tied to the duration of that PHE declaration, makes a case for maintaining it, and outlines priority actions to permanently strengthen SNAP’s ability to fight hunger and support a more equitable economic recovery.

Tags: SNAP

New Research Shows Many Low-Income Households Have Little Financial Cushion as Hunger Cliff Looms

Legal/Food Stamp Director

The responses of Propel SNAP customers surveyed in November 2021 and recent data analyses reported by The New York Times underscore the precarious financial situation many low-income households face. This is even as temporary SNAP benefit boosts, monthly advance Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments, and other federal initiatives have helped mitigate household hardship and stimulate the economy during COVID-19. With some federal aid payments slated to sunset, the implications for policymakers are significant.

Tags: SNAP

Addressing the Looming Hunger Cliff: Improve SNAP Deductions

Legal/Food Stamp Director

Households with low incomes face hard choices between paying for food and paying for other basics such as shelter and medicine. Those choices will get even harder for participants when the COVID-19 health emergency ends and, with it, the SNAP Emergency Allotments that have boosted benefits temporarily. Most SNAP participants will lose an average of $82 a month.

A SNAP deductions strategy should be an important part of addressing that looming “hunger cliff.”

Tags: SNAP

Close SNAP Benefit Gaps

Legal/Food Stamp Director

As of mid-November 2021, 40 states, Washington, D.C., Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been approved to continue EAs for all SNAP households. The statutory authority for those issuances, however, will end when pandemic-related health emergency declarations end.
At that point, unless Congress takes action, all SNAP households will revert to traditional program calculations. On average, SNAP households in the formerly EA states will lose $82 per month in SNAP benefits.

Tags: SNAP

Importance of SNAP and Child Support Payments to Child Food Security and Well-Being

Senior Advisor for SNAP

A recent “NCSEA On Location” podcast, sponsored by the National Child Support Enforcement Association, focused on how the child support program and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) work to address food insecurity within families. In general, child support refers to the ongoing payments made by one parent to another parent to provide financial support for a child.