Build Back Better Act (Budget Reconciliation) – Immediate Action Needed
On September 10, the House Education and Labor Committee completed its markup of the Build Back Better Act and advanced, by a vote of 28-22, nearly $35 billion in additional Child Nutrition Programs funding. These critical investments would ensure children have access to the nutrition they need year-round, and help families recover from the pandemic. As other House committees mark up their portion of the bill, deliberations on the overall reconciliation package continue with House and Senate Democratic leadership and Administration officials.

Take Action Now: Advocates are urged to contact their Members of Congress immediately to support the House Build Back Better Act, a historic investment in anti-poverty programs. It is critically important to reiterate the impact these provisions will have on children and families in the Member’s District/State. House and Senate champions must stay strong in protecting the overall package, especially anti-hunger and anti-poverty provisions. Members of Congress who are demanding a reduction in the size of the package must be held accountable and warned of the harmful consequences to the health and welfare of constituents back home. Learn more.

Actions for Individuals

Update on FY 2022 Agriculture Appropriations

On July 29, by a vote of 219-208, the House passed its fiscal year (FY) 2022 agriculture appropriations (spending) bill, H.R. 4356, in a package including six other appropriations bills (H.R. 4502). Check out FRAC’s analysis of the House agriculture appropriations bill for more information.

On August 2, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies advanced its FY 2022 agriculture appropriations bill, and the bill will be marked up in the full committee on Wednesday, August 4. Read a summary of the Senate bill from the Senate Appropriations Committee.

The agriculture appropriations bill is one of 12 appropriations (spending) bills that Congress must pass by September 30 of each fiscal year to keep government programs funded.

President Biden’s FY 2022 Budget

On Friday, May 28, the White House released President Biden’s proposed FY 2022 budget. Check out the fact sheet from the Office of Management and Budget.

Update on Recovery Plans

On April 28, President Biden presented the American Families Plan, which includes nutrition program investments that ensure children have access to the nutrition they need year-round, as well as other critical investments needed to offset rising hunger by providing much-needed assistance to low-income households. Urge Congress to move quickly and enact the American Families Plan and to pass additional relief packages.

On March 11, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 was signed into law. The COVID-19 relief bill will help bolster nutrition assistance for tens of millions of people across the country.

Congress Passes Year-End Package with COVID Relief and FY 2021 Appropriations

Before leaving for the holidays, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, a package that would provide an immediate and essential downpayment on nutrition and other critical assistance for tens of millions of people across the country whose lives have been upended by the pandemic. The relief package boosts the SNAP maximum benefit by 15 percent for six months (through June 30, 2021), among other nutrition and anti-poverty provisions. Check out FRAC’s statement for more information, as well as the Congressional division-by-division summaries of the COVID relief provisions, appropriations provisions, and authorizing matters of the package. The President signed the bill into law on December 27, 2020.

Check Out SNAP Bills We’re Supporting

Check out FRAC’s Bills We’re Supporting page for bills introduced in the 117th Congress related to budget, appropriations, anti-poverty policy, and other critical issues.

Budget Reconciliation 101

Curious about Budget Reconciliation? Unsure about the process or special rules to look out for? Explore this three-page report that explains what you need to know.

Read FRAC’s Budget Reconciliation 101.

President’s FY 2021 Budget Would Increase Hunger and Poverty in America

On February 10, the president released his proposed FY 2021 budget. The budget recycles many of the harmful policy proposals in the administration’s previous budgets, including deep cuts to federal safety net programs. The budget would cut SNAP benefits by more than $180 billion over 10 years, including by reprising the widely ridiculed “America’s Harvest Box.” These proposed deep cuts to SNAP are on top of the billions of dollars in ten-year SNAP benefit cuts that the administration is seeking via rule makings. The budget would also cut school meals by $1.7 billion over 10 years by reducing the number of schools eligible to implement the Community Eligibility Provision and by changing the process for verifying school meal applications, which would result in eligible students losing access to free and reduced-price school meals. Read FRAC’s statement and detailed analysis of the president’s proposed budget.

Explore These Topics

  • FY 2021 Appropriations
    On December 27, 2020, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 was signed into law, which provided FY 2021 appropriations and an immediate and essential downpayment on nutrition and other critical assistance for tens of millions of people across the country. The relief package boosts the SNAP maximum benefit by 15 percent for six months (through June 30, 2021), among other nutrition and anti-poverty provisions. Check out FRAC’s statement for more information, as well as the Congressional division-by-division summaries of the COVID relief provisions, appropriations provisions, and authorizing matters of the package.

    Stay up-to-date on the federal appropriations process through the Congressional Research Service’s Appropriations Status Table.

  • Refundable Tax Credits
    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC) are critical anti-poverty programs and should be expanded. In 2019, the EITC and CTC together lifted about 7.5 million people above the poverty line, including 4 million children. Both of these tax credits are refundable, meaning that they can reduce a filer’s tax burden to zero and any remaining amount is treated as a direct refund to the filer.

    Income thresholds for the EITC are dictated by marital status and number of children. The amount of the EITC depends on the filer’s income, the number of children, and marital status. In 2020, the EITC is worth a maximum of $6,660, but the EITC for childless workers is worth only $529. In 2021, thanks to temporary changes in the American Rescue Plan Act, the maximum for childless workers was increased to $1,502.

     

    The American Rescue Plan Act also included a robust expansion of the Child Tax Credit (CTC) which is projected to cut child poverty nearly in half. The improved CTC will provide families with $3,600 per child under age 6 and $3,000 per child ages 6-17. This benefit is now available to families with little or no income who were previously excluded from the CTC benefit.

    While this is great news, this expansion is authorized for just one year. Congress and the White House must make these program improvements permanent. President Biden’s American Families Plan would, in addition to critical nutrition and other investments, make permanent the full refundability of the CTC to provide support to families who have been affected by the pandemic and for parents who have been forced to cut down on work or give up jobs to take care of children after losing access to child care.

Did You Know?

Every year, Congress is supposed to follow a similar schedule of events throughout the budget and appropriations process. However, in recent years, this process has not always been followed — but the general schedule remains the same.