Listen to the conference call: Spotlight on Seniors and SNAP

This interactive discussion focuses on policies and best practices for connecting more eligible older Americans with SNAP and helping them obtain more adequate benefit amounts. Topics range from model application assistance strategies, technology tools for streamlining enrollment, and ways to take into account older Americans’ out of pocket medical expenses.

Listen here

SNAP Map: SNAP Matters to Seniors

It’s time to close the senior SNAP gap! Explore our new interactive mapping tool, developed with AARP Foundation, to see how many eligible seniors (60+) are using — and missing out on — SNAP in your state.

Explore here

Data Analysis Reveals that Millions of Households with Seniors Rely on SNAP to Stave Off Hunger

One in 10 of the nation’s 43.8 million households with seniors (age 60+) participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), on average each year between 2012–2016. This is according to U.S. Census Bureau data analyzed in interactive tools released today by the Food Research & Action Center (FRAC), in collaboration with AARP Foundation.

Read more

Free Online Course to Help Health Care Providers Address Senior Hunger

Screen and Intervene: Addressing Food Insecurity Among Older Adults

In just 60 minutes, health care providers and community-based partners can learn how to screen patients age 50 and older for food insecurity and connect them to key nutrition resources like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

The course, developed by FRAC and the AARP Foundation, is approved for 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (MDs and DOs). All other learners can download a certificate of participation upon completion of the course. See the course for more information.

Get Started

Did You Know?

Too many of our nation’s seniors struggle against hunger. In 2017, three million households with at least one adult age 65 or older were food insecure. Millions more households with seniors face marginal food security.

One in 10 of the nation’s 43.8 million households with seniors (age 60+) participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), on average each year between 2012–2016.

SNAP Matters to Seniors factsheets are available for every state.

Follow this link to additional senior hunger resources in FRAC’s Resource Library.

Quick Facts

  • In 2017, 9.2% – 4.7 million – of the 51 million people age 65 and over in the United States lived at or below the poverty level.1
  • In 2017, three million food-insecure households included a senior age 65 or older.2
  • 1.2 million seniors age 65 or older who lived alone were food insecure in 2017, and approximately 524,000 of these seniors were experiencing very low food insecurity.3
  • SNAP benefitted approximately 5 million households with at least one senior age 60 or older in FY 2017.4 Even so, millions of eligible seniors miss out on SNAP.5
  • The average monthly SNAP benefit for a senior age 60 or older was $101 in fiscal year 2017.6

Sources:

1Fontenot, K., Semega, J., and Kollar, M., U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P60-263, Income and Poverty in the United States: 2017, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 2018.
2Coleman-Jensen, A., Rabbitt, M. P., Gregory, C. A., & Singh, A. (2018). Household food security in the United States in 2017. Economic Research Report, 256. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
3Ibid.
4Cronquist, K., Lauffer, S. (2019). Characteristics of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Households: Fiscal Year 2017. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Office of Policy Support.
5FRAC Interactive Map: SNAP Participation Rates Among Eligible Seniors (Age 60+) in an Average Month in FY 2015.
6FRAC analysis of FY 2017 SNAP Quality Control data.

SNAP is the first line of defense against senior hunger.

  • Why SNAP Matters for Seniors
    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP):

    • is available to every eligible senior, in every corner of the country.
    • provides seniors with significant food purchasing power every month of the year.
    • improves food insecurity and health, helping seniors to maintain their independence.
    • reaches by far and away more seniors than any of the federal nutrition programs available to seniors.

    In addition to SNAP, seniors could be eligible for additional federal programs depending on their income, health status, age, and whether the program is available in their area.

  • Closing the Senior SNAP Gap
    Only an estimated 45 percent of eligible seniors participate in SNAP. This compares to 88 percent of non-elderly adults in FY 2016. Why?

    • Stigma
    • Misinformation about the program
    • Lack of information on how to apply
    • Barriers related to mobility

    One of the key strategies to addressing senior hunger is to connect more eligible seniors to SNAP. To improve participation, FRAC is working to remove barriers facing seniors through federal legislation that will improve benefit levels, and by partnering with state officials, advocates, service providers and other stakeholders to strengthen state policies.

    Source: Cunnyngham, K. (2018). Trends in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation Rates: Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2016. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Office of Policy Support.

  • Risk Factors for Food Insecurity Among Older Adults
    Certain older adults are at higher risk for food insecurity than others. Research shows that food insecurity rates tend to be higher among older adults who are:

    • Low income
    • Less educated (i.e., less than a high school education)
    • Black
    • Hispanic
    • Separated or divorced, or never married
    • Residing in the South
    • Unemployed
    • Living with a disability
    • Living alone
    • “Younger” older adults (food insecurity among older adults decreases somewhat with age due to the availability of age-specific safety net programs, such as Medicare and Social Security)

    Sources: Ziliak, J. P., & Gundersen, C. (2018). The State of Senior Hunger in America 2016: An Annual Report. Prepared for Feeding America and the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger.

    Strickhouser, S., Wright, J. D., & Donley, A. M. (2014). Food Insecurity Among Older Adults. Washington, DC: AARP Foundation. (Technical note: Based on low and very low food security data presented in Table 2b for 50-59 year olds and Table 2c for those aged 60 and older.)

  • Older Adults Living with Children
    Older adults may reside in a household with children under 18 years of age (e.g., their own children, grandchildren), which can increase the likelihood of experiencing food insecurity. Parents and caregivers often try to protect children from food insecurity by, for example, sacrificing their own food and nutrition needs so that the children can eat.

    National data show that:

    • Rates of household food insecurity are 1.5 times higher among households with any children present (compared to households without children).
    • Rates of household food insecurity are at least two times higher among households with a grandchild present (compared to households without a grandchild present).

    Sources:

    Do, D., Rodgers, R., & Rivera Drew, J. A. (2015). Multigenerational families and food insecurity in the United States, 1998-2013. Integrated Health Interview Series, Data Brief No. 1.

    Coleman-Jensen, A., Rabbitt, M. P., Gregory, C. A., & Singh, A. (2018). Household food security in the United States in 2017. Economic Research Report, 256. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

    Ziliak, J. P., & Gundersen, C. (2016). Multigenerational families and food insecurity. Southern Economic Journal, 82(4), 1147–1166.

  • Other Federal Nutrition Programs for Seniors
    In addition to SNAP, seniors could be eligible for additional federal programs depending on their income, health status, age, and whether the program is available in their area.
Maryland Enacts Legislation to Provide Seniors With Additional SNAP Benefits
Thousands of Maryland seniors struggle to put food on the table. Thanks to legislation pushed by Maryland Hunger Solutions, that struggle became a little bit more bearable.
SNAP Benefits for Seniors