Share the word on the WIC Fruit and Vegetable Expansion Provision!

FRAC has compiled an outreach toolkit so you can share the word about the new WIC fruit and vegetable expansion.

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WIC Guide for Health Care Providers

Poor nutrition, poverty, and food insecurity have detrimental impacts on infant, child, and maternal health and well-being. Connecting patients to WIC is an evidence-based strategy to address these issues. Only about one-quarter of eligible 4-year-old children participate in the program. As a health care provider, you are a trusted messenger, so your referral and education regarding WIC can help eligible families, especially those with children between 1 and 5 years old, receive the program’s critical nutritional resources. This resource provides information about WIC and the importance of referring eligible people to this critical Child Nutrition Program.

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Food Research & Action Center’s WIC Program Brief: One Year of WIC During COVID-19: Waivers are Vital to Participation and Benefit Redemption

WIC is an important resource during COVID-19. WIC improves participants’ health, dietary intake, and birth and health outcomes. WIC also supports learning and development, reduces food insecurity, and helps to alleviate poverty. In addition, WIC supports economic stability and improves the availability of healthy foods in low-income communities through participating stores. This brief details the change in WIC participation and food costs during the first full year of COVID-19 (March 2020 through February 2021).

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New Report Enhancing Young Children’s Access to Local Foods and Farm to ECE: Federal Funding Opportunities

The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound impacts across food and early care and education (ECE) systems that has exacerbated inequities and racial injustices in food, health, and education. While severely devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent economic crisis, the ECE sector and food and agriculture systems are ripe with opportunity to build back with greater equity and resiliency. Farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) can be a component of building back better.

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Making WIC Work Better: Strategies to Reach More Women and Children and Strengthen Benefits Use

Check out the report for more information on how to break down barriers to participation, identify strategies for your state, community or program, and to make the case for WIC.

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New Fact Sheet WIC for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

Grandparents are the primary caregiver for 6 percent of children under 6 years old. According to USDA, over 5 percent of WIC-eligible infants and children live in families without parents; 3.6 percent live with a related nonparent caretaker, and 1.7 percent live with an unrelated nonparent caretaker. The recommendations in the FRAC Fact Sheet focus on specialized outreach, policies, and services that can be used to help overcome barriers and maximize participation.

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New State Fact Sheets on Infant and Toddler Health from FRAC and the Think Babies™ Campaign

Are infants and toddlers in your state getting the nutrition they need for a healthy start in life? Find out with a new set of fact sheets released by the Food Research & Action Center and the Think Babies™ campaign.

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The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children — known as WIC — provides low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children with nutritious foods, nutrition education, and improved access to health care in order to prevent nutrition-related health problems in pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood.

Quick Facts: 2018 WIC Participation

  • Approximately 6.9 million women, infants, and children relied on the WIC program each month.
  • Each month, WIC provided nutritious food to approximately: 3.5 million children, 1.7 million infants, and 1.6 million women.
  • WIC was created in 1974 in response to the realization that inadequate nutrition poses real dangers to pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children.