SNAP/Food Stamp Participation

2014

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMay


2013

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember

 


June 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down By More Than 1.2 Million People Over the Year

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

June 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

National SNAP participation in June 2014 was 46,496,145 persons, a drop of 1,264,102 persons compared with June 2013. While compared with May 2014, national SNAP participation level increased by 220,999 persons, that increase was concentrated heavily in North Carolina (which added 161,823 participants). Previously, for much of 2013 and 2014, North Carolina’s SNAP enrollment numbers had been depressed in connection with application and recertification processing delays.

Economic Factors

Economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in June of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

Compared with the prior June, 41 states and the District of Columbia registered drops in SNAP participation in June 2014.  Nine states bucked that trend and increased participation between June 2013 and June 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, Colorado, and Pennsylvania.  Five of those states (California, Hawaii, Colorado, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, nearly one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served.  SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.


May 2014 SNAP Caseloads Drop; 6th Consecutive Month Below 47 Million people

May 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in May 2014 dropped by 22,294 to 46,225,054 people; that represented a decrease of 1,410,172 people compared with May 2013. This is the sixth consecutive month that SNAP participation has averaged below 47 million people.

State Trends

In May 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with May 2013 levels. Seven states increased participation between May 2013 and May 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Three of those states (California, Hawaii, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).

Economic Factors

Economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in May of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, more than one in six people eligible for SNAP are not served. Among eligible elderly, the gap is wider—nearly three in five are missed. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.


April 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down Over the Year

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

April 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

An over-the-month increase of 149,751 in the national SNAP participation level to 46,247,450 persons in April 2014 was driven by a one-month jump of 216,544 persons in North Carolina; but even with that development, national SNAP participation was still 1,301,127 persons lower in April 2014 than in April 2013. The April 2014 national SNAP participation level is lower than all but two months dating back to October 2011.

State Trends

North Carolina had experienced significant backlogs in processing SNAP applications in 2013 and early 2014, with some cases pending more than 90 days. USDA imposed a series of deadlines for North Carolina to clear the backlogs, with the final deadline set for March 31, 2014.

In April 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with April 2013 levels. Eight states increased participation between April 2013 and April 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Four of those states (California, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).

Economic Factors
Economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in April of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


March 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

March 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in March 2014 dropped to 46,097,719 persons, a decrease of 79,476 persons compared with February 2014 and a decrease of 1,626,877 persons compared with March 2013. The March participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to lower SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in March of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In March 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with March 2013 levels. Eight states, however, increased participation between March 2013 and March 2014: Nevada, Connecticut, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, New Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


February 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

February 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels.  Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served.  SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Decrease in January 2014

SNAP Matters for Millions of People Across US

January 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels. Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S — of which about 2.2 million are children — above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies — each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


 

SNAP Caseloads Decrease in December 2013

SNAP Matters for Millions of People Across U.S.

December 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in December 2013 dropped to 46,782,047 persons, a decrease of 253,597 persons compared with November 2013 and a decrease of 1,010,009 persons compared with December 2012. Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in December of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

State Trends

In December 2013 the District of Columbia and 39 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with November 2012 levels. Eleven states, however, increased participation between December 2012 and December 2013, with Maryland, California, and Hawaii increasing by at least 3.5 percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity. A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Decrease in November 2013

SNAP Matters for Millions of People Across US

November 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in November 2013 dropped to 47,033,135 persons, a decrease of 379,910 persons compared with October 2013 and a decrease of 648,937 persons compared with November 2012. Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in November of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

State Trends

In November 2013 the District of Columbia and 37 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with November 2012 levels. Of the 13 states with participation increases between November 2012 and November 2013, three had increases of 3 percent or more (Maryland, California, and Hawaii).

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 2.2 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.



October 2013 SNAP Caseloads Up Over Month But Down Over the Year

October 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national person-level participation increased by 110,228 between September and October of 2013 for a total of 47,415,895 participants. Participation, however, decreased by 135,934 from October 2012 to October 2013.

About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in October of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. It is not a coincidence that these numbers are similar; both SNAP participation and the U-6 reflect economic hardship and employment inadequacy. That is, unemployment and underemployment in most states as well as efforts to enroll more eligible people in SNAP will increase SNAP participation.

State Trends

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia experienced SNAP caseload increases between October 2012 and October 2013. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were Maryland, Connecticut, and Hawaii, all of which increased by over four and a half percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite recent growth in SNAP caseloads, participation gaps remain: more than one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.0 million people in the U.S–of which about 1.8 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.



SNAP Caseloads Decrease from August to September 2013

Economy and Other Factors in Play

September 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in September 2013 dropped to 47,305,667 persons, a decrease of 359,389 compared with August 2013 and a decrease of 404,616 compared with September 2012.  Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation and likely affected trends, but economic hardship remains relatively high and much of the recent SNAP caseload declines are explained by state-specific factors. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP, about the same ratio of workers who were unemployed or underemployed in September of 2013, according to FRAC analysis of USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure.

State Trends

North Carolina, where glitches with a new computer eligibility system have led to widespread reports of benefit terminations and lengthy processing delays, accounted for large shares of the over-the-month and over-the-year participation declines.  Louisiana, which operated Disaster SNAP for victims of Hurricane Isaac in September 2012 and of Hurricane Gustav in September 2008, accounted for much of the over-the-year and over-the five year drops.

Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia experience SNAP caseload increases between September 2012 and September 2013. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were Maryland, Wyoming, and Connecticut, all of which increased by over five percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

SNAP participation gaps remain. One in four people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.0 million people in the U.S–of which about 1.8 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Slightly Increase from July to August 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

August 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national person-level participation increased by 27,061 between July and August of 2013 for a total of 47,665,069 participants. Participation also increased by 562,304 from August 2013 to August 2013. The observed increase in yearly participation numbers demonstrates that SNAP continues to be an important nutritional safety net for people all over the country, especially as unemployment and underemployment rates remain high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in August of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. It is not a coincidence that these numbers are similar; both SNAP participation and the U-6 reflect economic hardship and employment inadequacy. That is, unemployment and underemployment in most states as well as efforts to enroll more eligible people in SNAP will increase SNAP participation.

State Trends

Increased SNAP caseloads between August 2012 and August 2013 occurred in 35 states and the District of Columbia. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were Wyoming, Maryland and Hawaii, all of which increased by over five percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite recent growth in SNAP caseloads, participation gaps remain: One in four people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 4.0 million people in the U.S–of which about 1.8 million are children–above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Slightly Dip in July 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

July 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national person-level participation decreased by 122,840 between June and July of 2013 for a total of 47,637,407 participants. Participation, however, increased by 955,574 from July 2012 to July 2013. The observed increase in yearly participation numbers demonstrates that SNAP continues to be an important nutritional safety net for people all over the country, especially as unemployment and underemployment rates remain high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in July of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. It is not a coincidence that these numbers are similar; both SNAP participation and the U-6 reflect economic hardship and employment inadequacy. That is, unemployment and underemployment in most states as well as efforts to enroll more eligible people in SNAP will increase SNAP participation.

State Trends

Increased SNAP caseloads between July 2012 and July 2013 occurred in 38 states and the District of Columbia. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were Wyoming, Maryland and Ohio, all of which increased by over eight percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite recent growth in SNAP caseloads, participation gaps remain: One in four people eligible for SNAP is not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted nearly 4 million people in the U.S above the poverty line in 2012. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Increased in June 2013

June 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need
SNAP national person-level participation increased by 125,059 between May and June of 2013 for a total of 47,760,285 participants. Participation also increased by over 1.08 million from June 2012 to June 2013. The observed increase in both the monthly and yearly participation numbers demonstrate that SNAP continues to be an important nutritional safety net for people all over the country, especially as unemployment and underemployment rates remain high.

About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in June of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. It is not a coincidence that these numbers are similar; both SNAP participation and the U-6 reflect economic hardship and employment inadequacy. That is, unemployment and underemployment in most states as well as efforts to enroll more eligible people in SNAP will increase SNAP participation.

State Trends
Increased SNAP caseloads between June 2012 and June 2013 occurred in 39 states and the District of Columbia. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were IL (which received disaster assistance), WY, and MD, all of which increased over eight percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship
Despite recent growth in SNAP caseloads, participation gaps remain: One in four people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012. And new data released by USDA on September 4 show persistently high rates of food insecurity across the U.S., with one in six Americans struggling with hunger in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities
For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 3.9 million people in the U.S–of which about 1.7 million are children–above the poverty line in 2011. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Increased in May 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

May 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national person-level participation increased by 86,720 between April and May of 2013 for a total of 47,635,297 participants. Participation also increased by over 1.13 million from May 2012 to May 2013. The observed increase in both the monthly and yearly participation numbers demonstrate that SNAP continues to be an important nutritional safety net for people all over the country, especially as unemployment and underemployment rates remain high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and/or were unemployed or underemployed in May of 2013, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. It is not a coincidence that these numbers are similar; both SNAP participation and the U-6 reflect economic hardship and employment inadequacy. That is, unemployment and underemployment in most states as well as efforts to enroll more eligible people in SNAP will increase SNAP participation.

State Trends

Increased SNAP caseloads between May 2012 and May 2013 occurred in 39 states and the District of Columbia. The three states with the highest SNAP person-level increases were WY, IL, and MD, all of which increased over eight percent.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite recent growth in SNAP caseloads, participation gaps remain: One in four people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal recovery dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S. A recent FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in four people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2012.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, would have lifted 3.9 million people in the U.S– of which about 1.7 million are children–above the poverty line in 2011. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies — each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Caseloads Dip in April 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

April 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national participation in April 2013 decreased by 175,902 people over the month to 47,548,694 people, but was 1.3 million persons higher than in April 2012. The Program provided an important nutrition safety net across the country.

Overall, unemployment and underemployment in most states and efforts to enroll more eligible needy people are factors in SNAP caseload trends.

More than one in seven Americans receives SNAP – that percentage (15.2 % percent) is comparable to the percentage of the American workforce affected by unemployment or underemployment (13.9 percent) in April 2013 according to US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 Measure.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP caseloads between April 2012 and April 2013 occurred in 39 states and the District of Columbia. The three states registering over-the-year percentage increases of eight percent or higher were MD, IL, WY.

Still Missing Eligible People at a Time of Food Hardship

Despite recent SNAP caseload growth, gaps in participation remain. One in four people eligible for SNAP go unserved. Implementing SNAP policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

High rates of unemployment, underemployment, and poverty are contributing to great need. In 2012, nearly one in five Americans struggled with “food hardship,” according to a FRAC analysis of data (pdf) collected through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project.

SNAP Effect on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted in income, would have lifted 3.9 million Americans—1.7 million of then children–above the poverty line in 2011.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children whose households received increased SNAP benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before the recession, before the SNAP benefit boost, and then during the two years following the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

SNAP also matters for local economies. Based on USDA research, it is estimated that each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Participation Increases in March 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

March 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national participation in March 2013 increased by 168,888 people over the month to 47,727,052 people, and was 1.3 million persons higher than in March 2012. The Program provided an important nutrition safety net across the country.

Overall, unemployment and underemployment in most states and efforts to enroll more eligible needy people are factors in SNAP caseload trends.

More than one in seven Americans receives SNAP – that percentage (15.2 % percent) is comparable to the percentage of the American workforce affected by unemployment or underemployment (13.8 percent) in March 2013 according to US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 Measure.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP caseloads between March 2012 and March 2013 occurred in 44 states and the District of Columbia. The three states registering over-the-year percentage increases of eight percent or higher were IL, MD, WY.

Still Missing Eligible People at a Time of Food Hardship

Despite recent SNAP caseload growth, gaps in participation remain. One in four people eligible for SNAP go unserved. Implementing SNAP policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

High rates of unemployment, underemployment, and poverty are contributing to great need. In 2012, nearly one in five Americans struggled with “food hardship,” according to a FRAC analysis of data (pdf) collected through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project.

SNAP Effect on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted in income, would have lifted 3.9 million Americans—1.7 million of then children–above the poverty line in 2011.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children whose households received increased SNAP benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before the recession, before the SNAP benefit boost, and then during the two years following the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

SNAP also matters for local economies. Based on USDA research, it is estimated that each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Participation Continues Decline in February 2013

Caseloads Reflect Economic Need

February 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national participation in February 2013 decreased by 213,962 people over the month to 47,558,101 people, and was 1.2 million persons higher than in February 2012. The Program provided an important nutrition safety net across the country.

Overall, unemployment and underemployment in most states and efforts to enroll more eligible needy people are factors in SNAP caseload trends.

More than one in seven Americans receives SNAP – that percentage (15.2% percent) is comparable to the percentage of the American workforce affected by unemployment or underemployment (14.3 percent) in February 2013 according to US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 Measure.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP caseloads between February 2012 and February 2013 occurred in 41 states and the District of Columbia. The three states registering over-the-year percentage increases of eight percent or higher were IL, WY, LA.

Still Missing Eligible People at a Time of Food Hardship

Despite recent SNAP caseload growth, gaps in participation remain. One in four people eligible for SNAP go unserved. Implementing SNAP policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

High rates of unemployment, underemployment, and poverty are contributing to great need. In 2012, nearly one in five Americans struggled with “food hardship,” according to a FRAC analysis of data (pdf) collected through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project.

SNAP Effect on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted in income, would have lifted 3.9 million Americans—1.7 million of then children–above the poverty line in 2011.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children whose households received increased SNAP benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before the recession, before the SNAP benefit boost, and then during the two years following the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

SNAP also matters for local economies. Based on USDA research, it is estimated that each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.


SNAP Participation Takes Small Drop in January 2013

Caseloads Reflect Continued Economic Need

January 2013 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-state analysis (pdf)

SNAP national participation in January 2013 decreased by 19,948 people over the month to 47,772,108 people, and was 1.3 million persons higher than in January 2012. The Program provided an important nutrition safety net across the country.

Overall, unemployment and underemployment in most states and efforts to enroll more eligible needy people continue to contribute to SNAP caseload.

More than one in seven Americans receives SNAP – that percentage (15.2% percent) is comparable to the percentage of the American workforce affected by unemployment or underemployment (14.4 percent) in January 2013 according to US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 Measure.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP caseloads between January 2012 and January 2013 occurred in 40 states and the District of Columbia. The six states registering over-the-year percentage increases of eight percent or higher were IL, WY, HI, FL, NJ, LA.

Still Missing Eligible People at a Time of Food Hardship

Despite recent SNAP caseload growth, gaps in participation remain. One in four people eligible for SNAP go unserved. Implementing SNAP policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

High rates of unemployment, underemployment, and poverty are contributing to great need. In 2012, nearly one in five Americans struggled with “food hardship,” according to a FRAC analysis of data (pdf)  collected through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project.

SNAP Effect on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. Reports from the U.S. Census Bureau and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) show that SNAP benefits, if counted in income, would have lifted 3.9 million Americans—1.7 million of then children–above the poverty line in 2011.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf)  documents health improvements for young children whose households received increased SNAP benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before the recession, before the SNAP benefit boost, and then during the two years following the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

SNAP also matters for local economies. Based on USDA research, it is estimated that each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2012 for more information.