SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Data

2016

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMay


2015

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember


2014

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberNovemberDecember


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped By More Than 2 Million People in May 2016

Trends Factors: Some Economic Improvement But Also Jobless Worker Cutoffs and Weak Energy Sector

May 2016 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 43,478,196 persons in May 2016, a decrease of 92,772 persons compared with April 2016 and a decrease of 2,017,088 persons compared with May 2015. This is the lowest SNAP national participation level since October 2010.

The downward SNAP participation trend in May 2016 likely reflects a mix of factors: on the one hand, improved economic conditions have lessened financial need among some households; on the other hand, harsh time limits have pushed certain jobless adults off the rolls. Still, SNAP matters for many Americans across the country as they struggle against problems of underemployment and stagnant wages, particularly in states experiencing sharp job losses in the energy sector.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House Report (pdf)  confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

SNAP participation declined between May 2015 and May 2016 in 38 states and the District of Columbia, mostly reflecting improved economic conditions, but in some states time limits on SNAP benefits for certain jobless adults also likely contributed to steep participation declines.

Seven of the eight states (Louisiana, Wyoming, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania) with the largest over-the-year SNAP participation increases in May 2016 also ranked among the eight states with the biggest job loss in oil and gas rigs as a share of total employment. Read the full Brookings Institution analysis here.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In April 2016, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 16 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2015.

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the onset of the Great Recession, about 17 percent of those eligible go unserved and SNAP is missing nearly six in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”
Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

The same study also found that the ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA. “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.”

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months.”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Fell by Over 773,000 People in April 2016 to Its Lowest Level in Five and a Half Years

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

April 2016 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 43,571,080 persons in April 2016, a decrease of 773,134 persons compared with March 2016 and a decrease of 1,867,711 persons compared with April 2015. This is the lowest SNAP national participation level since October 2010. Still, SNAP matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment and stagnant wages.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House Report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

SNAP participation declined between April 2015 and April 2016 in 39 states and the District of Columbia, mostly reflecting improved economic conditions, but in some states (Florida, Indiana, Mississippi and Wisconsin) time limits on SNAP benefits for certain jobless adults also likely contributed to steep participation declines. In Kentucky in April 2016 SNAP participation increased over the prior month, after the state corrected the access glitches in the new “Benefind” eligibility system it launched in March 2016.

Of the 11 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in April 2016, six (Wyoming, Nevada, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Texas, and Nebraska) ranked among the 15 worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels. In Massachusetts, the over-the-year increase largely reflects actions the state initiated in early 2015 to correct systemic problems that had led to closures or denials of many client cases without an eligibility determination in 2014.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In April 2016, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 16 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2015.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 17 percent of those eligible go unserved and SNAP is missing nearly six in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

The same study also found that the ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA. “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.”

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months.”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by Nearly 1.3 Million People in March 2016 to Its Lowest Level in Five Years

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

March 2016 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 44,344,259 persons in March 2016, a decrease of 38,667 persons compared with February 2016 and a decrease of 1,297,492 persons compared with March 2015. This is the lowest SNAP national participation level since February 2011. Still, SNAP matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment and stagnant wages.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House Report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America  (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

SNAP participation declined between March 2015 and March 2016 in 39 states and the District of Columbia, mostly reflecting improved economic conditions. However, the double-digit declines in Kentucky in March 2016, compared with February 2016 and March 2015, reportedly are attributable to widespread access problems after the state implemented its new “Benefind” eligibility system.

Of the 11 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in March 2016, six (Wyoming, Nevada, North Dakota, Texas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma) ranked among the 15 worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels. In Louisiana, Disaster-SNAP and other relief in the wake of March 2016 floods contributed to significant SNAP participation increases over-the-month and over-the prior March. In Massachusetts, the over-the-year increase largely reflects actions the state initiated in early 2015 to correct systemic problems that had led to closures or denials of many client cases without an eligibility determination in 2014.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In January 2016, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 17 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2014.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 17 percent of those eligible go unserved (pdf) and SNAP is missing nearly six in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts
For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

The ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA. “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.”

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months(.)”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research
from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by Nearly 1.3 Million People in February 2016 to Its Lowest Level in Five Years

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

February 2016 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 44,391,436 persons in February 2016, a decrease of 461,016 persons compared with January 2016 and a decrease of 1,290,975 persons compared with February 2015. This is the lowest SNAP national participation level since February 2011. Still, SNAP matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment and stagnant wages.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf)  confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 11 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in February 2016, six (Wyoming, Nevada, North Dakota, Texas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma) ranked among the 15 worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels. In Massachusetts, the over-the-year increase largely reflects actions the state initiated in early 2015 to correct systemic problems that had led to closures or denials of many client cases without an eligibility determination in 2014.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In January 2016, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 17 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2014.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 15 percent of those eligible for SNAP are not served (pdf). SNAP is missing nearly six in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”
Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

The ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA. “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.” Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months(.)”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by More Than 1,000,000 People in January 2016 to Its Lowest Level Since April 2011

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

January 2016 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 44,705,445 persons in January 2016, a decrease of 483,306 persons compared with December 2015. This is the lowest SNAP national participation level since April 2011. Most states experienced decreases in caseloads; nationally, there was a SNAP participation decrease of 1,323,485 persons compared with January 2015. SNAP still matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment, stagnant wages and natural disasters.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 11 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in January 2016, six (Wyoming, Nevada, North Dakota, Texas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma) ranked among the 15 worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels. In Massachusetts, the over-the-year increase largely reflects actions the state started initiating in early 2015 to correct systemic problems that had led to closures or denials of many client cases without an eligibility determination in 2014.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In January 2016, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 17 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in the first six months of 2015.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 15 percent of those eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP is missing nearly four in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”
Read more: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

The ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA. “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.” Read More: Massachusetts Inpatient Medicaid Cost Response to Increased Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months….”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by More Than 1,000,000 People in December 2015

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

December 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year Change, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,188,655 persons in December 2015, a decrease of 265,216 persons compared with November 2015.  Most states experienced decreases in caseloads; nationally, there was a SNAP participation decrease of 1,063,419 persons compared with December 2014. SNAP still matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment, stagnant wages and natural disasters.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 13 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in December 2015, one (South Carolina) had some flood victim households on temporary Disaster SNAP, and four (Wyoming, Nevada, California, and North Dakota) ranked the four worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In December 2015, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in ten were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 17 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in the first six months of 2015.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 15 percent of those eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP is missing nearly four in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.
Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”
Read More: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302990

The ARRA SNAP boost also had a positive impact on Medicaid costs, according to newly published analysis of data from MA.  “Medicaid cost growth fell in Massachusetts after SNAP benefits increased, especially for people with chronic illnesses with high sensitivity to food insecurity.” Read More:  http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302990

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months….”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”
For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).

 

 


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by More Than 800,000 People in November 2015

Disaster SNAP Benefits for South Carolina Flood Victims Largely Accounted for Temporary Participation Increase in November 2015

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

November 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,453,806 persons in November 2015, an increase of 85,541 persons compared with October 2015, with temporary Disaster SNAP (D-SNAP benefits for South Carolina flood victims largely driving that outcome.  Most states experienced decreases in caseloads over the month and over the year in November 2015; nationally, there was a SNAP participation decrease of 809,290 persons compared with November 2014. SNAP still matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment, stagnant wages and natural disasters.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 12 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in November 2015, four (Wyoming, Nevada, California, and North Dakota) ranked as the worst states in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2013). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In November 2015, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in nine were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. A FRAC analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that 17 percent of respondents did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in the first six months of 2015.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about 15 percent of those eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP is missing nearly four in ten eligible elderly persons. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars.

The Positive Effect of SNAP Benefits on Participants and Communities

Economic Impacts

For struggling families and communities, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. For example, SNAP is good for local economies – each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

Census Bureau data also show the crucial importance of federal nutrition programs and other supports for low-income families. If SNAP benefits are counted as income, 3.6 million people were lifted out of poverty in 2014, according to the Census Bureau. And, when looking at the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being, SNAP lifted 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2014.

Health Impacts

Numerous studies demonstrate that SNAP participation and the amounts of monthly SNAP benefits received by households affect the health and well-being of families and children. For instance, a Children’s HealthWatch brief documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.”

Food Security Impacts

There is strong evidence of SNAP’s effectiveness in alleviating food insecurity. Two studies included in the recent “Long-Term Benefits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program” White House Report demonstrate this point. Mabli and Ohls (2015) compared households’ state of food security before and after receiving SNAP benefits and found that “SNAP participation reduced the overall fraction of households that were food insecure and the fraction that were very low food secure by around 17 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Mabli and Worthington (2014) find even larger impacts on children’s food security in low-income households with children, showing that food insecurity among children fell by roughly 33 percent after their families had been receiving benefits for about six months….”

Furthermore, the ARRA SNAP benefit boost was terminated effective November 2013 with negative impacts on families. In the wake of that cut, new research from Children’s HealthWatch finds that low monthly SNAP benefit levels and the November 2013 rollback in SNAP benefits have had “a measurable, negative effect on household and child food insecurity.”

For more information on SNAP’s impacts on poverty, food security, health, and well-being, see FRAC’s SNAP and Public Health: The Role of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Improving the Health and Well-Being of Americans (pdf).


October 2015 Marked Fifth Straight Monthly Decline in SNAP Participation

SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Dropped by More Than One Million People in October 2015

Research Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

October 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,368,348 persons in October 2015, a decrease of 29,097 persons compared with September 2015, and a decrease of 1,114,275 persons compared with October 2014. October 2015 marked the fifth straight monthly decline in SNAP participation, as the economy showed improvement. Still, SNAP matters for many Americans across the country, particularly as they struggle against problems of underemployment and stagnant wages.

Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The White House report findings, however, suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. The U.S. Conference of Mayors survey on hunger and homelessness (pdf) released in December 2015 also points to increasing SNAP benefits as one of the strategies to address hunger. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 11 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in October 2015, five (Nevada, Nebraska, Alaska, North Dakota, and California) rank among the 10 worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). SNAP outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declined by More Than One Million People in September 2015

A Recent White House Report Shows SNAP’s Effectiveness But Underscores A Need for Increasing Benefits to Achieve Even Stronger Outcomes

September 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,415,445 persons in September 2015, a decrease of 48,988 persons compared with August 2015, and a decrease of 1,044,485 persons compared with September 2014.

Still, the program matters for many Americans across the country. Research findings in a December 2015 White House report (pdf) ) confirm SNAP’s effectiveness in promoting good health, education and food security outcomes. The report findings, however suggest that current SNAP benefit amounts are inadequate for households. FRAC’s Plan to End Hunger in America (pdf) includes recommendations to increase SNAP benefit levels and strengthen SNAP’s positive effects further.

State Trends

Of the 14 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in September 2015  four (Nevada, Nebraska, North Dakota and California ) rank among the 10 worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by More Than One Million People in August 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

August 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,464,508 persons in August 2015, a decrease of 42,564 persons compared with July 2015, and a decrease of 1,011,783 persons compared with August 2014.

State Trends

Between August 2014 and August 2015, 40 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. Restrictive policies and procedures appear to have contributed to large caseload declines in Maine, Wisconsin and Massachusetts in early 2015, compared with early 2014, but Massachusetts registered a caseload increase for the fourth month in a row in August 2015, reflecting recent actions to address access barriers in that state.”

Of the 10 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in July 2015 four (Nevada, Nebraska, New Jersey and California ) rank among the 15 worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over One Million People in July 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

July 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged, 45,480,644 persons in July 2015, a decrease of 29,507 persons compared with June 2015, and a decrease of 1,006,244 persons compared with July 2014.

State Trends

Between July 2014 and July 2015, 39 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. Restrictive policies and procedures appear to have contributed to large caseload declines in Maine and Massachusetts in early 2015, compared with early 2014, but Massachusetts registered a caseload increase for the third month in a row in July 2015, reflecting recent actions to address access barriers in that state.”

Of the 10 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in July 2015 three (Nevada, Nebraska, and New Jersey ) rank among the 15 worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over 740,000 People in June 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

June 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,510,153 persons in June 2015, an increase of 14,869 persons compared with May 2015, but a decrease of 985,640 persons compared with June 2014.

State Trends

Between June 2014 and June 2015, 38 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. Restrictive policies and procedures appear to have contributed to large caseload declines Maine and Massachusetts in early 2015, compared with early 2014, but Massachusetts registered a caseload increase between May 2015 and June 2015, reflecting recent actions to address access barriers in that state.

Of the 12 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases in June 2015  four (Nevada, California, Nebraska, and New Jersey ) rank among the 15 worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over 740,000 People in May 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

May 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation averaged 45,495,380 persons in May 2015, a decrease of 56,589 persons compared with April 2015, and a decrease of 740,226 persons compared with May 2014.

State Trends

Between May 2014 and May 2015, 39 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new restrictive policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline.

North Carolina, whose eligibility processing system problems had contributed to a double digit percentage participation decline between May 2013 and May 2014, registered the highest SNAP participation increase in May 2015. Of the other 10 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, California, and Nebraska) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over 800,000 People in April 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

April 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 45,438,832 persons in April 2015, a decrease of 202,930 persons compared with March 2015, and a decrease of 808,516 persons compared with April 2014.

State Trends

Between April 2014 and April 2015, 38 states experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline. In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 12 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, California, and Nebraska) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 California ranked second worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians; Nevada ranked third worst, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and Nebraska ranked tenth worst, missing 1 in 4 eligible Nebraskans. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Nearly 456,000 People in March 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across the Nation

March 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 45,641,762 persons in March 2015, a decrease of 40,649 persons compared with February 2015, and a decrease of 455,937 persons compared with March 2014.

State Trends

Between February 2014 and February 2015, 38 states experienced participation declines.  In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements.  In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline.  In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 12 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, two (Nevada and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels. North Carolina’s relatively large jump in participation in March 2015, compared with March 2014, likely reflects state actions directed by USDA to address backlogs in processing SNAP applications that had depressed participation in 2013 and early 2014.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Nearly 500,000 People in February 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

February 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 45,682,474 persons in February 2015, a decrease of 346,456 persons compared with January 2015, and a decrease of 494,721 persons compared with February 2014.

State Trends

Between February 2014 and February 2015, 38 states experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline. In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 12 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, two (Nevada and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by More than 500,000 People in January 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

January 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,029,343 persons in January 2015, a decrease of 222,731 persons compared with December 2014, and a decrease of 501,546 persons compared with January 2014.

State Trends

Between January 2014 and January 2015, 37 states experienced participation declines.  In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements.  In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline.  In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 13 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, two (Nevada and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Continues to Decline with Over 530,000 Fewer Participants in December 2014

December 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,252,064 persons in December 2014, a decrease of 11,302 from November 2014. A larger decrease was seen over the year with 530,020 fewer persons participating, or 1.1 percent, from December 2013 to December 2014.

State Trends

Between December 2013 and December 2014, 37 states experienced participation declines. Of the 13 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, Hawaii, and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012).  In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans. Hawaii ranked fourth worst, missing nearly 4 of 10 eligible Hawaiians; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


November 2014 SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over 760,000

November 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,271,508 persons in November 2014, a decrease of 206,170 from October 2014. A larger decrease was seen over the year with 764,136 fewer persons participating, or 1.6 percent, from November 2013 to November 2014.

State Trends

Between November 2013 and November 2014, 38 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. Of the 12 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, Hawaii, and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans. Hawaii ranked fourth worst, missing nearly 4 of 10 eligible Hawaiians; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Participation Drops By More Than 845,000 People Between September 2013 and September 2014

September 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in September 2014 was 46,459,998, a drop of 16,412 persons compared to the prior month, but a drop of 845,726 persons compared with September 2013.

State Trends

Between September 2013 and September 2014, ten states increased participation: Nevada, North Carolina, California, New Mexico, West Virginia, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, and Illinois. Four of those states (Nevada, California, New Jersey, and Hawaii) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2011).


August 2014 SNAP Caseloads Decrease Slightly Over Month, Down Over the Year

August 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

The August 2014 national SNAP participation level of 46,484,828 persons in August 2014 was a mere 2,060 person dip over the prior month but a decrease of 1,180,228 persons over August 2013.

State Trends

In August 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with August 2013 levels. Seven states increased participation between August 2013 and August 2014: California, Connecticut, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Two of those states (California and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


July 2014 SNAP Caseloads Remain Flat Over Month but Down Over the Year

July 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

An over-the-month decrease of 9,818 persons in the national SNAP participation level to 46,486,434 persons in July 2014 did not meaningfully change from June 2014. SNAP participation did decrease, however, by 1,151,034 persons from July 2013 to July 2014.

State Trends

In July 2014 the District of Columbia and 41 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with July 2013 levels. Nine states increased participation between July 2013 and July 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Hawaii, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Colorado, and New Mexico. Five of those states (California, Hawaii, Colorado, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


June 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down By More Than 1.2 Million People Over the Year

June 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

National SNAP participation in June 2014 was 46,496,145 persons, a drop of 1,264,102 persons compared with June 2013. While compared with May 2014, national SNAP participation level increased by 220,999 persons, that increase was concentrated heavily in North Carolina (which added 161,823 participants). Previously, for much of 2013 and 2014, North Carolina’s SNAP enrollment numbers had been depressed in connection with application and recertification processing delays.

State Trends

Compared with the prior June, 41 states and the District of Columbia registered drops in SNAP participation in June 2014.  Nine states bucked that trend and increased participation between June 2013 and June 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, Colorado, and Pennsylvania.  Five of those states (California, Hawaii, Colorado, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


May 2014 SNAP Caseloads Drop; 6th Consecutive Month Below 47 Million People

May 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in May 2014 dropped by 22,294 to 46,225,054 people; that represented a decrease of 1,410,172 people compared with May 2013. This is the sixth consecutive month that SNAP participation has averaged below 47 million people.

State Trends

In May 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with May 2013 levels. Seven states increased participation between May 2013 and May 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Three of those states (California, Hawaii, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


April 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down Over the Year

April 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

An over-the-month increase of 149,751 in the national SNAP participation level to 46,247,450 persons in April 2014 was driven by a one-month jump of 216,544 persons in North Carolina; but even with that development, national SNAP participation was still 1,301,127 persons lower in April 2014 than in April 2013. The April 2014 national SNAP participation level is lower than all but two months dating back to October 2011.

State Trends

North Carolina had experienced significant backlogs in processing SNAP applications in 2013 and early 2014, with some cases pending more than 90 days. USDA imposed a series of deadlines for North Carolina to clear the backlogs, with the final deadline set for March 31, 2014.

In April 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with April 2013 levels. Eight states increased participation between April 2013 and April 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Four of those states (California, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


March 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

March 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in March 2014 dropped to 46,097,719 persons, a decrease of 79,476 persons compared with February 2014 and a decrease of 1,626,877 persons compared with March 2013. The March participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to lower SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in March of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In March 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with March 2013 levels. Eight states, however, increased participation between March 2013 and March 2014: Nevada, Connecticut, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, New Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.


February 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

February 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels.  Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.


SNAP Caseloads Decrease in January 2014

January 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels. Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.