Data and Publications

To gauge the success and reach of the federal nutrition programs, FRAC charts participation in these programs through monthly updates, annual publications, and additional research. This section of FRAC’s website contains the latest reports and data for all the major federal nutrition programs.

Latest Reports


snap_people_disabilities_report_coverSNAP Matters for People with Disabilities
Poverty, hunger, and food insecurity disproportionately affect Americans who have communicative, mental, or physical disabilities. In this report, FRAC examines SNAP’s role among programs to assist people with disabilities as well as rules and policies that make SNAP accessible and responsive. It also looks at current law to provide recommendations on how to strengthen SNAP’s support for people with disabilities through state policy options, agency practices, and outreach.

Summer Meals

summer_report_cover_2015Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation: Summer Nutrition Status Report
Summer 2014 yielded good news for the Summer Nutrition Programs and for low-income children. Last summer marked the largest increase in children eating summer meals since July 1993, the third year of growth in the programs. During July 2014, the Summer Nutrition Programs served nearly 3.2 million children, an increase of 215,000 (7.3 percent) from 2013.

Food Hardship

food_hardship_cover_2014How Hungry is America? FRAC’s National, State and Local Index of Food Hardship
This report contains food hardship data for the nation, every state, and 100 of the country’s largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). It found that one in six Americans (17.2 percent) said in 2014 that there had been times over the past 12 months that they didn’t have enough money to buy food that they or their families needed. Hunger exists in every state in the country, and 98 of the largest 100 surveyed Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) have at least one in eight (12.5 percent or more) households reporting food hardship.

School Breakfast

school_breakfast_paid_trendsSchool Breakfast Program: Trends and Factors Affecting Student Participation
This report examines trends in school breakfast participation over the past decade, and finds rapid growth in this program both before and after the new, improved nutrition standards for breakfast were introduced. found that free and reduced-price student breakfast participation increased as the new nutrition standards were implemented. Participation among students who pay most of the cost of their own meals (“paid” students) remained stable. A companion piece examines changes in lunch participation.

School Lunch

nslp_report_coverNational School Lunch Program: Trends and Factors Affecting Student Participation
This analysis delves into the complex and long-term economic and policy-related causes that are leading to changes in participation levels. It shows that lower family incomes and improvements to the eligibility process for school meals have led to a continuous increase in participation among low-income children; and rules on pricing of meals for other children have contributed to a multi-year decline in participation for those with higher family incomes.