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  • Advocacy Tool

    Restoring the value of the minimum wage — and helping families cover basic needs — is essential to addressing hunger. The federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour has not increased since 2009. A more adequate minimum wage would foster the nation’s economic strength and growth to be shared in more equitable ways. Low-income workers and their families would benefit the most from a higher minimum wage, leading to reduced poverty, hunger, and income inequality.

    From FRAC, the Economic Policy Institute, and the National Employment Law Project.

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  • Report

    The monthly benefits provided by SNAP enhance the foodpurchasing power of eligible low-income individuals and families. However, as described by many studies, including one by the Institute of Medicine, the greatest shortcoming of SNAP is that benefits for most households are not enough to get through the entire month without hunger or being forced to sacrifice nutrition quality. This limitation persists even in the face of overwhelming evidence on the gains from more adequate monthly SNAP benefits.

    This paper briefly analyzes why SNAP benefits are inadequate, reviews the body of research showing positive effects from more adequate SNAP benefits, and concludes with some of the key policy solutions that can improve benefit adequacy.

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  • Advocacy Tool

    More than 40 million Americans are living in households that are food insecure. Even as the economy has improved, millions of families have been left behind, and the need for food assistance remains high. Congress should deepen its historically bipartisan commitment to programs that provide food assistance to vulnerable low-income households by protecting the structure of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the other federal nutrition programs, and by sufficiently funding them to address hunger in America.

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  • Advocacy Tool

    On February 1, USDA published a Proposed Rule on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): Requirements for Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents RIN 0584-AE57. That rule, if adopted, would make changes to SNAP that Congress specifically declined to make in the recently enacted 2018 Farm Bill. The proposed changes would decrease state flexibility, harm local economies, and increase hunger. They should be rejected.

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  • Fact Sheet

    When considering adopting community eligibility, schools often question how its implementation might affect the allocation of certain federal funds, specifically Title I funding. This concern arises because under community eligibility, schools no longer process school meal applications, and the percentage of students certified for free and reduced-priced school meals are commonly used to distribute Title I funds to schools. Fortunately, there are other allowable measures that school districts with community eligibility can use to allocate Title I funds. This resource provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the relationship between community eligibility and the allocation of Title I funds.

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    This interactive map provides state-by-state data on participation in the free and reduced-price School Breakfast Program, as compared to participation in the free and reduced-price National School Lunch Program. Data are also featured in FRAC’s reports, School Breakfast Scorecard: School Year 2017-2018, and School Breakfast: Making it Work in Large School Districts, released February 13, 2019.

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  • Fact Sheet

    Summary of FRAC’s annual School Breakfast Scorecard, which ranks national and state participation in the School Breakfast Program, providing millions of children a healthy morning meal each school day.

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  • Graphic

    Download and share these graphics, featuring information from FRAC’s 2019 School Breakfast Scorecard.

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  • Archived

    Don’t let the Trump Administration take food away from 750,000 people. Spread the word with these infographics.

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  • Guide

    Governors can play a critical role in establishing and strengthening statewide summer meal expansion efforts. This guide is designed to provide governors and their staff an understanding of the Summer Nutrition Programs; examples of short-term and long-term actions that states can take to connect more families to summer meal sites; and best practices for successful implementation.

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  • Report

    This annual analysis looks at school breakfast participation and policies in 75 large school districts across the country to evaluate successful practices in reaching more low-income children with school breakfast. It is a companion report to the School Breakfast Scorecard.

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  • Report

    This annual report analyzes participation in the School Breakfast Program among low-income children nationally and in each state and the District of Columbia for the 2017–2018 school year. The report also features best practices for increasing participation in the program, including breakfast after the bell models and community eligibility. Also see: School Breakfast: Making it Work in Large School Districts.

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  • Toolkit

    Now is the time to plan for the logistical operations of your sponsorship for the Summer Nutrition Programs. Consider the factors impacting your site staff and their trainings, the meals you will be serving, and the programming and activities you will be offering the children who come to your sites.

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  • Toolkit

    Selected resources from states and organizations on the government shutdown and federal nutrition programs.

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  • Fact Sheet

    Download this document which features these six steps to help engage hospitals on summer meals: 1. Check out a Hospital’s Community Needs Assessment; 2. Contact the Hospital to Discuss Summer Meals; 3. Be a Voice in the Hospital’s Planning; 4. Host a Community Forum; 5. Connect a Hospital with an existing Sponsor and/or Site;
    6. Recruit Hospitals to Help with Outreach.

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