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  • Advocacy Tool

    Food insecurity, and its root cause, poverty, do not discriminate: they harm individuals, families, and communities across the U.S., regardless of demographics. One group that rarely receives attention for its alarmingly high levels of food insecurity and poverty is Asian Pacific American (APA). This oversight is detrimental for APA people and the nation as a whole.

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  • Guide

    This one page brief highlights COVID-19 resources for Older Adults, highlighting changes in benefits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Home-Delivered Meals, and additional Federal Nutritional Programs.

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  • Chart

    This chart breaks down U.S. Department of Agriculture — Food and Nutrition Services and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — Administration for Community Living programs available to Older Adults surrounding food resources, specifically in response to COVID-19.

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  • Report

    This brief explores four available actions to minimize exposure to
    COVID-19 through person-to-person contact when it comes to older
    adults accessing food.

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  • Report

    This letter from FRAC to the U.S. Department of Agriculture comments on the proposed rule, “Simplifying Meal Service and Monitoring Requirements in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs” 85 Fed. Reg. 16273 (March 23, 2020). The proposed rule would weaken nutrition standards, eliminate the guarantee that all children will receive a balanced and healthy school meal regardless of school setting, and diminish the nutritional value of other foods sold in the cafeteria.

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  • Guide

    FRAC has created this guide to share the options available to school districts and community partners to serve meals, answer commonly asked questions, and share best practices.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The Families First Coronavirus Response Act creates the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) program, an important opportunity to provide nutritional resources to families who are losing access to free or reduced-price school meals as school across the country close in response to COVID-19. This resource provides information on the program and helpful information for implementation, including helpful resources.

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  • Guide

    FRAC’s update summarizing the Families First Act’s changes to Child and Adult Care Food Program waivers.

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  • Guide

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created a State WIC agency template to allow agencies to request the following WIC flexibilities granted under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

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  • Guide

    The Families First Coronavirus Response Act gives the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) the authority to issue nationwide waivers to ensure access to meals through the child nutrition programs as communities respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and to issue waivers to increase cost. This resource provides a list of the waivers as of April 8, 2020, that are in effect until June 30, 2020.

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  • Report

    Food insecurity is a social determinant of health affecting tens of millions of Americans. In response to these and other health and economic impacts, the health care sector is increasingly recognizing and investing in strategies that address and alleviate food insecurity such as screening patients for food insecurity and connecting at-risk patients to the federal nutrition programs and other food resources.

    This brief provides examples of work by leading medical and health organizations to support Hunger Vital SignTM National Community of Practice members’ efforts to improve the food security of their patients at practice and policy levels — work that ultimately promotes positive health outcomes, addresses longstanding disparities in health, and reduces health care costs.

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  • Advocacy Tool

    During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it is crucial to preserve access to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food benefits, nutrition and breastfeeding support, and referrals to services. The COVID-19 virus is negatively impacting public health and the American economy, creating significant challenges for low-income people. This resource outlines key actions that WIC, advocates, partner organizations, and State and local policymakers can take to help preserve access to WIC during this pandemic.

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  • Report

    As more schools close as a result of COVID-19, a growing number of children are losing access to the school breakfasts and lunches that support their health and well-being. Advocates, school districts and out-of-school time program providers have an important role to play mitigating the impact on families who rely on free and reduced-price school meals to keep hunger at bay. School and community partners can leverage federal resources and work together to ensure access to nutritious meals during these school closures.

    Here is a guide to ensuring access to the child nutrition programs
    in the event of school closures.

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  • Report

    On February 10, 2020, President Trump released his fiscal year (FY) 2021 budget proposal, which recycles many of the harmful proposals in the president’s previous budgets. In it, he proposes huge cuts to overall USDA funding and devastating cuts to SNAP and child nutrition programs. This analysis highlights areas of the budget that fund key anti-hunger and anti-poverty programs and how the proposed budget, if implemented, would harm the health and well-being of millions of people in our country.

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  • Fact Sheet

    DHS’ Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds final rule went into effect on February 24, 2020, and anti-hunger and nutrition stakeholders have important roles to play in providing basic facts about SNAP and other public benefit programs and in providing referrals to reliable legal resources on public charge questions. This FAQ provides information on the DHS public charge rule and how the rule intersects with the food security of immigrant families. This FAQ does not constitute legal advice or take the place of legal advice from an immigration attorney.

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