Search & Filter

Switch View
  • Advocacy Tool

    The Pandemic Child Hunger Prevention Act would provide free breakfast and lunch to all students attending schools that participate in the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) during the 2020–2021 school year.

    Read the Advocacy Tool
  • Advocacy Tool

    Food insecurity, and its root cause, poverty, do not discriminate: they harm individuals, families, and communities across the U.S., regardless of demographics. One group that rarely receives attention for its alarmingly high levels of food insecurity and poverty is Asian Pacific American (APA). This oversight is detrimental for APA people and the nation as a whole.

    Read the brief
  • Advocacy Tool

    During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it is crucial to preserve access to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food benefits, nutrition and breastfeeding support, and referrals to services. The COVID-19 virus is negatively impacting public health and the American economy, creating significant challenges for low-income people. This resource outlines key actions that WIC, advocates, partner organizations, and State and local policymakers can take to help preserve access to WIC during this pandemic.

    Learn more
  • Advocacy Tool

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently issued a proposed rule that would roll back important aspects of the current school meal nutrition standards and significantly unravel the progress made under the Healthy, hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

    Learn more
  • Advocacy Tool

    Congress has an important opportunity in 2020 to improve the health of millions of our nation’s children by passing a strong reauthorization that protects and strengthens the child nutrition programs. These successful, cost-effective federal nutrition programs play a critical role in helping children in low=income families achieve access to child care, education, and enrichment activities while improving overall nutrition, health, development, and academic achievement.

    Learn more
  • Advocacy Tool

    Update for Anti-Hunger and Nutrition Stakeholders: Unpacking the Three Public Charge Rules seeks to provide anti-hunger and nutrition stakeholders with key updates on the status of public charge rules from three federal agencies — Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, and Department of Justice — that intersect with federal nutrition programs, particularly the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and actions that stakeholders can take to assist immigrants.

    Learn more
  • Advocacy Tool

    FRAC urges Congress to enact a child nutrition bill that supports and strengthens program access and participation by underserved children and communities; ensures nutrition quality; and simplifies program administration and operation. The reauthorization should maintain and build upon the critical gains made in the last reauthorization. In order to achieve these goals, FRAC asks Congress to make these improvements to the child nutrition programs.

    Find out more
  • Advocacy Tool

    Community roundtable discussions are effective and valuable tools to connect local advocates and stakeholders with their Members of Congress during congressional recesses and whenever Members are home. Combining a community roundtable with a site visit offers a unique way for Members to see firsthand the importance of programs, like summer meals, followed by a roundtable discussion that provides a diverse group of advocates and stakeholders a forum to engage.

    Fmd out more
  • Advocacy Tool

    The upcoming Child Nutrition Reauthorization offers Congress the opportunity to address school meals debt, which is a common problem for school districts across the country. School meals debt can occur when students who are not certified to receive free school meals arrive in the cafeteria without cash in hand or in their school meals account to pay for their meals or for the “reduced-price” copayment.

    Find out more
  • Advocacy Tool

    This primer examines the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in improving the health, nutrition, and well-being of millions of senior adults (age 60 and older) struggling against hunger, and it summarizes opportunities to expand this vital program to reach more seniors across the country.

    Read the report
  • Advocacy Tool

    Federal tax credits, like the EITC and refundable CTC, provide critical supports for millions of working women, children, and families every year. They supplement low wages and can help soften the financial impact of fluctuating incomes or job losses. These credits are especially important for communities of color and women.

    Read more
  • Advocacy Tool

    Includes: The Strength of SNAP and SNAP Action Needed; The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP); Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP); Child Nutrition Reauthorization

    Read more
  • Advocacy Tool

    Restoring the value of the minimum wage — and helping families cover basic needs — is essential to addressing hunger. The federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour has not increased since 2009. A more adequate minimum wage would foster the nation’s economic strength and growth to be shared in more equitable ways. Low-income workers and their families would benefit the most from a higher minimum wage, leading to reduced poverty, hunger, and income inequality.

    From FRAC, the Economic Policy Institute, and the National Employment Law Project.

    Read more
  • Advocacy Tool

    More than 37 million Americans are living in households that are food insecure. Even as the economy has improved, millions of families have been left behind, and need food assistance. Congress should deepen its historically bipartisan commitment to programs that provide food assistance to vulnerable people with low incomes by protecting the structure of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the other federal nutrition programs, and by sufficiently funding them to address the prevailing need.

    Read more
  • Advocacy Tool

    On February 1, USDA published a Proposed Rule on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): Requirements for Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents RIN 0584-AE57. That rule, if adopted, would make changes to SNAP that Congress specifically declined to make in the recently enacted 2018 Farm Bill. The proposed changes would decrease state flexibility, harm local economies, and increase hunger. They should be rejected.

    Download