2009 SNAP Data

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December 2009

SNAP/Food Stamps Participation in December 2009 Nearly 39 Million Persons
One in Eight Americans Receives SNAP/Food Stamps
Recovery Act Boosts, Outreach Efforts and Smart Policy Choices Making Difference

December 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In December 2009, SNAP/Food Stamps participation continued to break records, rising to 38,978,382 people, an increase of 794,714 individuals from November 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 7.2 million people compared with the prior December.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between December 2008 and December 2009 occurred in all parts of the country. Three states experienced over-the-prior December percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Nevada (48.8%); Idaho (46.6%) and Wisconsin (40.1%).

December is the ninth month that the SNAP/Food Stamps benefit boost, which was included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamps households–for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The ARRA increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamps spending on local economies. Total spending for SNAP/Food Stamps benefits in December 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to over $5.2 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits to more than $9.6 billion in December 2009.

Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in December 2009 was approximately 22 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

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November 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Tops Record 38 Million People in November 2009
One in Eight Americans Receives SNAP/Food Stamps
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps’ Economic Impact

November 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In November 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation continued to break records, rising to a record 38,183,668 people, an increase of 245,636 individuals from October 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 7 million people compared with the prior November.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

Increases in caseloads between November 2008 and November 2009 occurred in all parts of the country. Nevada’s caseload jumped 51.7 percent in that time. Two states experienced over-the-prior November percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Idaho (47.4%) and Florida (40.9%). Another 14 states experienced increases above 30 percent: New Hampshire (39.4%); Wyoming (39.4%); Rhode Island (38.8%); Wisconsin (37.8%); Colorado (37%); Arizona (36.7%); Utah (36.6%); Vermont (36%); South Dakota (35.3%); Washington (35.3%); Minnesota (32%): Hawaii (31.2%); Connecticut (30.8%); and Oregon (30.3%).

November is the eighth month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in November 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to over $5.1 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $9.3 billion in November 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in November 2009 was approximately 21.4 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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October 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Sets Another Record As Nearly 38 Million Received Benefits in October 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve One in Eight Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps’ Economic Impact for Families and Communities

October 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In October 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation continued to break records, rising to a record 37,924,669 people, an increase of 746,542 individuals from September 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6.9 million people compared with the prior October.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states except Texas (where October 2008 caseloads included temporary participation by hurricane victims) reported increases in caseloads between October 2008 and October 2009. Nevada’s caseload jumped 52.7 percent in that time. Three states experienced over-the-prior October percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Idaho (45.2%); Utah (43.2%); and Florida (42.1%). Another ten states experienced increases above 30 percent: New Hampshire (39.1%); Washington (38.9%); Vermont (37.8%); Arizona (37.6%); South Dakota (37.1%); Wisconsin (36.9%); Wyoming (36.9%); Colorado (36%); Rhode Island (35.8%); and Oregon (30.7%).

October is the seventh month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the programs’stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in October 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to over $5 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $9.3 billion in October 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in October 2009 was 21.1 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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September 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Sets Another Record As Nearly 37.2 Million Received the Benefit in September 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve One in Eight Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps’ Economic Impact for Families and Communities

September 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In September 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation continued to break records, rising to a record 37,175,938 people, an increase of 680,035 individuals from August 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 5.6 million people compared with the prior September.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states reported increases in caseloads between September 2008 and September 2009. Nevada’s caseload jumped 53.7 percent in that time. Four states experienced over-the-prior September percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Utah (46.5%); Washington (44.7%); Idaho (42.5%); and Florida (42.1%). Thirteen states experienced increases above 30 percent: Vermont (39.5%); New Hampshire (39%); Wisconsin (38%); Arizona (37.3%); Colorado (37%); South Dakota (35.1%); Wyoming (34.6%); Rhode Island (34.5%); Maryland (31.4%); Oregon (31.5%); Georgia (31.2%); Delaware (30.3%); and Michigan (30.1%).

The decrease experienced by Louisiana (a 64.7 percent drop from September 2008 to September 2009) was due largely to the impact of Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in summer 2008. Louisiana’s caseload spiked in September 2008 as residents turned to Disaster SNAP/Food Stamp benefits.

September is the sixth month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the programs’ stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in September 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to $4.94 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $9.1 billion in September 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in September 2009 was 20.4 million more persons than in September 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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August 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Tops 36.4 Million in August 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve One in Eight Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps’ Economic Impact for Families and Communities

August 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In August 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation continued to break records, rising to a record 36,491,920 people, an increase of 640,751 individuals from July 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of 7 million people compared with the prior August.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states reported increases in caseloads between August 2008 and August 2009. Nevada’s caseload jumped 53.1 percent in that time. Four states experienced over-the-prior August percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Washington (47.9%); Utah (47.3%); Idaho (44.3%); and Florida (41.3%). Eleven states experienced increases above 30 percent: Vermont (39%); Wisconsin (37.1%); New Hampshire (36.5%); Arizona (36.1%); Colorado (35%); Maryland (32%); Rhode Island (31.5%); South Dakota (31.4%); Wyoming (31.4%); Georgia (30.9%); and Oregon (30.6%).

August is the fifth month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the programs’ stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in August 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to $4.85 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $8.9 billion in August 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in August 2009 was nearly 20 million more persons than in August 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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July 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Nears 36 Million in July 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve Nearly One in Eight Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps Economic Impact for Families and Communities

July 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In July 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation continued to break records, rising to a record 35,851,176 people, an increase of 725,621 individuals from June 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6.8 million people compared with the prior July.

Currently, nearly one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states reported increases in caseloads between July 2008 and July 2009. Five states experienced increases over-the-prior July percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Nevada (49.2%); Utah (46.8%); Idaho (42.3%); Washington (41.8%); and Florida (40.2%). Eight states experienced increases above 30 percent: Vermont (38.2%); Colorado (36%); Wisconsin (35.8%); Arizona (35.6%); New Hampshire (33.7%); Maryland (31.8%); Wyoming (31%); and Georgia (30.5%).

July is the fourth month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the programs’ stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in July 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to $4.8 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $8.7 billion in July 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in July 2009 was more than 19 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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June 2009

SNAP/Food Stamps Top 35 Million in June 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve One in Nine Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps Economic Impact for Families and Communities

June 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In June 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation rose to a record 35,122,123 people, an increase of 712,635 individuals from May 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 6.4 million people compared with the prior June.

Currently, one in nine Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states reported increases in caseloads between June 2008 and June 2009. Four states experienced increases over-the-prior June percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Utah (46.3%); Nevada (45.1%); Washington (45%); and Idaho (40.8%). Eight states experienced increases above 30 percent: Florida (38.6%); Vermont (37.4%); Arizona (34.4%); Colorado (34%); Wisconsin (31.7%); Wyoming (31.1%); Maryland (30.4%); and Georgia (30.2%).

June is the third month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the ARRA, took effect and bolstered the programs’ stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in June 2009 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to $4.7 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $8.6 billion in June 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in June 2009 was more than 18.3 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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May 2009

SNAP/Food Stamps Reach Record 34.4 Million in May 2009
SNAP/Food Stamps Serve One in Nine Americans
Recovery Act Bolsters SNAP/Food Stamps Economic Impact for Families and Communities

May 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In May 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation rose to a record 34,409,460 people, an increase of 651,323 individuals from April 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 6 million people compared with the prior May.

Currently, one in nine Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps. Click here to see a state-by-state analysis (share of total participation – pdf).

All states reported increases in caseloads between May 2008 and May 2009. Two states experienced increases over-the-prior May percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Nevada (42.5%) and Utah (42.4%). Seven states experienced increases above 30 percent: Idaho (38.3%), Washington (37.1%), Florida (36.5%), Vermont (35.2%), Wisconsin (32.7%), Colorado (32.2%), and Arizona (31.5%).

May is the second month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the federal economic recovery package (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act – ARRA), took effect and bolstered the programs’ stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

USDA research shows that each dollar in federal SNAP/Food Stamp benefits generates nearly double that in economic activity. Click here for more details on SNAP/Food Stamps and economic recovery. The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits in May 2009 due to ARRA raises and increased program participation rose to $4.6 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to more than $8.4 billion in May 2009.

Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in May 2009 was more than 17.6 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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April 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Continues to Set Record Levels; More than 33.7 Million Participate in April 2009
April Marks First Month Recovery Act Boost Took Effect, Lifting SNAP/Food Stamp Purchasing Power and Economic Stimulus Impact for Families and Communities

April 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In April 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation was 33,758,104 people, the highest participation level on record, and an increase of nearly 601,000 individuals from March 2009, the prior record level. Over the past twelve months, participation has grown by 5.6 million individuals.

April marks the first month that the SNAP/Food Stamp benefit boost, which was included in the federal economic recovery package, took effect. The economy recovery package raised benefit levels for SNAP/Food Stamp households-for example, $80 more per month for a household of four. The increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. Total spending for program benefits went up by nearly $723 million from March 2009 to April 2009 due to ARRA and increased participation, bringing the estimated total for economic stimulative impact of SNAP benefits to nearly $8.3 billion in April 2009.

USDA research shows that each dollar in federal SNAP/Food Stamp benefits generates nearly double that in economic activity. Click here for more details on SNAP/Food Stamps and economic recovery.

All states reported increases in caseloads between April 2008 and April 2009. Thirteen states registered over-the-prior April percentage caseload increases above 25 percent: Utah (45.5%), Nevada (39%), Idaho (36.3%), Washington (34.5%), Florida (34.2%), Vermont (33.6%), Wisconsin (31.3%), Arizona (29.7%), Colorado (28.9%), Georgia (28.3%), Maryland (27.2%), Massachusetts (25.3%), and Oregon (25%).

A weakened economy means that many more individuals are turning to SNAP/Food Stamps. Even before the latest economic crisis, more than 36.2 million people lived in U.S. households facing a constant struggle against hunger.

Federal, state and local governments and their private and nonprofit sector partners need to step up efforts to enroll more eligible people. Currently, one in three eligible people are missed. Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in April 2009 was more than 16 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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March 2009

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Continues to Set Record Levels; More than 33.1 Million Participate in March 2009
Recovery Act Further Boosts SNAP/Food Stamp Purchasing Power and Economic Stimulus Impact for Families and Communities

March 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In March 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation was 33,156,745 people, the highest participation level on record, and an increase of nearly 600,000 individuals from February 2009, the prior record level. Over the past twelve months, participation has grown by 5.2 million individuals.

All states reported increases in caseloads between March 2008 and March 2009. Eleven states registered over-the-prior March percentage caseload increases above 25 percent: Utah (37.1), Nevada (35.7), Idaho (35.4), Florida (32.1), Vermont (31.0), Washington (29.6), Wisconsin (29), Arizona (27.9), Georgia (26.2), Colorado (25.5), and Maryland (25).

Since April, implementation of the federal economic recovery package has meant higher benefits for SNAP/Food Stamp households—for example, $80 more per month for a household of four. The increases bolster the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. USDA research shows that each dollar in federal SNAP/Food Stamp benefits generates nearly double that in economic activity. Click here for more details on SNAP/Food Stamps and economic recovery.

A weakened economy means that many more individuals are turning to SNAP/Food Stamps. Even before the latest economic crisis, more than 36.2 million people lived in U.S. households facing a constant struggle against hunger.

Federal, state and local governments and their private and nonprofit sector partners need to step up efforts to enroll more eligible people. Currently, one in three eligible people are missed. Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in March 2009 was more than 16 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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February 2009

New SNAP/Food Stamp Record: 32.5 Million Participate in February 2009
Recovery Act Further Boosts SNAP/Food Stamp Purchasing Power and Economic Stimulus Impact for Families and Communities

February 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In February 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation was 32,554,795 people, the highest participation level on record, and an increase of nearly 350,000 individuals from January 2009, the prior record level.

All states reported increases in caseloads between February 2008 and February 2009. Fourteen states registered over-the-prior February percentage caseload increases above 20 percent: Idaho (34.6), Utah (32.8), Nevada (31.4), Florida (30.9), Arizona (27.4), Washington (27.4), Wisconsin (27.1), Vermont (24.9), Georgia (24.8), Maryland (23.7), Oregon (23.4), Massachusetts (23.1), Colorado (22.5), and Texas (20.6).

Since April, implementation of the federal economic recovery package has meant higher benefits for SNAP/Food Stamp households—for example, $80 more per month for a household of four. The increases bolster the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. USDA research shows that each dollar in federal SNAP/Food Stamp benefits generates nearly double that in economic activity. Click here for more details on SNAP/Food Stamps and economic recovery.

A weakened economy means that many more individuals are turning to SNAP/Food Stamps. Even before the latest economic crisis, more than 36.2 million people lived in U.S. households facing a constant struggle against hunger.

Federal, state and local governments and their private and nonprofit sector partners need to step up efforts to enroll more eligible people. Currently, one in three eligible people are missed. Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in February 2009 was more than 15 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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January 2009

New SNAP/Food Stamp Record: 32.2 Million Participate in January 2009
Eleven States Register Over-Year Increases Above 20 Percent
April Roll Out of Recovery Act Boosts SNAP/Food Stamp Purchasing Power and Economic Activity

January 2009 participation data tables (pdf)

In January 2009, SNAP/Food Stamp participation was 32,204,859 people, the highest participation level on record, and an increase of more than 400,000 individuals from December 2008, the prior record level.

Starting in April, implementation of the federal economic recovery package means higher benefits for SNAP/Food Stamp households—for example, $80 more per month for a household of four. The increases will bolster the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamp spending on local economies. USDA research shows that each dollar in federal SNAP/Food Stamp benefits generates nearly double that in economic activity. Click here for more details on SNAP/Food Stamps and economic recovery.

A weakened economy means that many more individuals are turning to SNAP/Food Stamps. Even before the latest economic crisis, more than 36.2 million people lived in U.S. households facing a constant struggle against hunger.

All states reported increases in caseloads between January 2008 and January 2009. Eleven states registered over-the-prior January percentage caseload increases above 20 percent: Idaho (32.3), Utah (29.8), Florida (29.1), Nevada (29.1), Arizona (25.7), Wisconsin (25.3), Georgia (23), Vermont (23.1), Maryland (22.5), Texas (21.7) and Massachusetts (21.5).

Federal, state and local governments and their private and nonprofit sector partners need to step up efforts to enroll more eligible people. Currently, one in three eligible people are missed. Implementing policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in January 2009 was more than 15 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals).

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