2005 SNAP Data

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember


December 2005

Nearly 1.2 Million More Food Stamp Participants In December 2005 Than in December 2004
Over Month Drops Reflect Waning Disaster Relief

December 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

In December 2005 food stamp participation dropped to 26,688,375 persons, 2.9 million persons fewer than November 2005 when disaster relief peaked for victims of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma. Nonetheless, the overall caseload was still nearly 1.2 million persons higher than the prior December and 8.0 million persons higher than in December 2001.

Food Stamp Program growth in recent years also reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in December 2005 was 9.8 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.
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November 2005

Hurricane Relief Boosted Food Stamp Participation Levels Again in November 2005
Nearly 3.4 Million of the 3.8 Million New Participants Were in Three States Hardest Hit by Hurricanes Since August 2005

November 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

In November 2005 food stamp participation rose to 29,596,860 people, 2,021,662 more than in October and 3,831,055 more than in August, largely due to the nutrition relief needed by victims of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. Three states with large numbers of those affected by the hurricanes – Florida, Louisiana, and Texas – accounted for nearly 3.4 million of the increase since August.

For the year (November 2004 to November 2005) the caseload grew by 4.4 million people. Florida alone accounted for nearly half (2.0 million persons) of the total over-the-year increase and largely accounted for the nation’s caseload increase from October to November, the eighth national monthly caseload increase in the first 11 months of 2005.

Food Stamp Program growth over the year also reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

Disaster Food Stamp Program Served Many Newly Needy

A positive feature of the Food Stamp Program is its ability to meet increased need, whether due to economic changes or disasters. For information about the Disaster Food Stamp Program, go to http://www.frac.org/html/disaster/disaster_index.html and http://www.frac.org/Press_Release/07.21.05.html

Three states with large numbers of those affected by the hurricanes– Florida, Louisiana, and Texas–accounted for nearly 3.4 million of the increase since August. Also ranking in the ten states with the largest percentage increases since August were three other states disproportionately impacted by hurricanes— Mississippi (hit by Katrina), Georgia and Arkansas (both reportedly serving large numbers of hurricane evacuees).

Not reflected in the caseload figures was additional nutrition assistance provided to many regular food stamp households affected by the hurricanes. Many households already enrolled in the program received replacement allotments to help cope with their food losses. Additional nutrition assistance also was provided to hurricane victims through the school meals programs, Child and Adult Care Food Program, and WIC Program.

The significant food stamp service to hurricane survivors was due to a combination of factors: the entitlement structure of the program which allowed it to respond quickly to deep and urgent need; strong leadership from political appointees and career officials at the US Department of Agriculture; key efforts of state governments; efficiency of the Electronic Benefit Transfer delivery system; and outreach and advocacy by non-profit groups.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in November 2005 was 12.7 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.
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October 2005

Food Stamp Participation Levels in October 2005 Reflect Strong Hurricane Relief Response
More than 1.5 Million of 1.8 Million New Participants Were in States Hardest Hit by Hurricanes Since August 2005

October 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

In October 2005 food stamp participation rose to 27,575,192 people, 39,983 more than in September and 1,809,387 more than in August, largely due to the nutrition relief needed by victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Six states with large numbers of those affected by the hurricanes – Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Arkansas – accounted for nearly 1.57 million of the increase since August, with more than 240,000 of the growth coming in other states.

This was the seventh monthly caseload increase in the first ten months of 2005, and the non-Katrina/Rita states’ data suggest growth occurred at a pace comparable to the earlier part of 2005 in the non-hurricane states.

Food Stamp Program growth over the year also reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

For the year (October 2004 to October 2005) the caseload grew by 1.34 million people. Not counting Florida (whose October 2004 caseload was high because of the Disaster Food Stamp Program response to the 2004 hurricanes), the caseload in the other 49 states and District of Columbia grew by more than 2.5 million persons over the year.

Disaster Food Stamp Program Served Many Newly Needy

A positive feature of the Food Stamp Program is its ability to meet increased need, whether due to economic changes or disasters. For information about the Disaster Food Stamp Program, go to http://www.frac.org/html/disaster/disaster_index.html and http://www.frac.org/Press_Release/07.21.05.html

Six states with large numbers of those affected by the hurricanes– Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Arkansas–accounted for nearly 1.57 million of the increase since August, with more than 240,000 of the growth coming in other states.

Not reflected in the caseload figures was additional nutrition assistance provided to many regular food stamp households affected by the hurricanes. Many households already enrolled in the program received replacement allotments to help cope with their food losses. Additional nutrition assistance also was provided to hurricane victims through the school meals programs, Child and Adult Care Food Program, and WIC Program.

The significant food stamp service to hurricane survivors was due to a combination of factors: the entitlement structure of the program which allowed it to respond quickly to deep and urgent need; strong leadership from political appointees and career officials at the US Department of Agriculture; key efforts of state governments; efficiency of the Electronic Benefit Transfer delivery system; and outreach and advocacy by non-profit groups.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in October 2005 was 10.7 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.
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September 2005

Hurricane Relief Pushed Food Stamp Participation Levels Up Dramatically in September 2005
More than 1.5 Million of 1.8 Million New Participants Were in States Hardest Hit by Hurricane Katrina

September 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

In September, 2005 food stamp participation rose to 27,537,209 people, 1,771,404 more than in August, largely due to the nutrition relief needed by victims of Hurricane Katrina. Four states with large numbers of those affected by the hurricane – Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas – accounted for more than 1.51 million of the increase since August, with 259,000 of the growth coming in other states.

This was the sixth monthly caseload increase in the first nine months of 2005, and the non-Katrina states data suggest growth occurred at a pace comparable to the earlier part of 2005 in the non-hurricane states.

Food Stamp Program growth over the year also reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

For the year (September, 2004 to September 2005) the caseload grew by 2.6 million people. Not counting Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas and Florida (Florida’s September 2004 caseload was high because of the Disaster Food Stamp Program response to the 2004 hurricanes), the caseload in the other 45 states and District of Columbia grew by 1.1 million over the year.

Disaster Food Stamp Program Served Many Newly Needy

A positive feature of the Food Stamp Program is its ability to meet increased need, whether due to economic changes or disasters. For information about the Disaster Food Stamp Program, go to http://www.frac.org/html/disaster/disaster_index.html and http://www.frac.org/Press_Release/07.21.05.html

Four states most affected by Hurricane Katrina and the influx of those affected ( Louisiana, Alabama, Texas and Mississippi) accounted for more than 1.51 million of the 1.77 million new cases in September. Increases in the states with the fifth, seventh and ninth biggest percentage jumps ( Georgia, Arkansas, and Florida, respectively) probably reflected at least in part the disproportionate share of hurricane evacuees in those states.

Not reflected in the caseload figures was additional nutrition assistance provided to many regular food stamp households affected by the hurricane. Many households already enrolled in the program received replacement allotments to help cope with their food losses. Additional nutrition assistance also was provided to Hurricane Katrina victims through the school meals programs, Child and Adult Care Food Program, and WIC Program.

The significant food stamp service to Hurricane Katrina survivors was due to a combination of factors: the entitlement structure of the program which allowed it to respond quickly to deep and urgent need; strong leadership from political appointees and career officials at the US Department of Agriculture; key efforts of state governments; efficiency of the Electronic Benefit Transfer delivery system; and outreach and advocacy by non-profit groups.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in September 2005 was 10.5 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.
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August 2005

Food Stamp Participation in August 2005 Nearly 1.2 Million Above August 2004 Level

August 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation rose by 201,764 people in August 2005 to 25,765,739, for an over-the-year increase of nearly 1.2 million people. This marked the fifth monthly caseload increase in the first eight months of 2005. Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in August 2005 was 8.89 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since then likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy for low-income families.

Participation has risen in 49 of the last 56 months. Compared to a year earlier, participation in August 2005 rose in all but five states.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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July 2005

Food Stamp Participation in July 2005 Nearly 1.2 Million Above July 2004 Level

July 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation rose by 56,531 people in July 2005 to 25,564,100, for an over-the-year increase of nearly 1.16 million people. This marked the fourth monthly caseload increase in the first seven months of 2005. Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing wage stagnation, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in July 2005 was 8.69 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since then likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy for low-income families.

Participation has risen in 48 of the last 55 months. Compared to a year earlier, participation in July 2005 rose in all but five states.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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June 2005

Food Stamp Participation in June 2005 More than 1.3 Million Above June 2004 Level

June 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation rose by 99,206 people in June 2005 to 25,507,695, for an over-the-year increase of over 1.3 million people. This marked the third monthly caseload increase in the first six months of 2005. Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in June 2005 was 8.63 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 47 of the last 54 months. Compared to a year earlier, participation in June 2005 rose in the District of Columbia and all but five states.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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May 2005

Food Stamp Participation in May 2005 More than 1.5 Million Above May 2004 Level

May 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation rose by 43,988 people in May 2005 to 25,408,930, for an over-the-year increase of nearly 1.5 million people. The slight monthly caseload increase is the second in the first five months of 2005. Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in May 2005 was 8.53 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 46 of the last 53 months. Compared to a year earlier, participation in May 2005 rose in all but four states and the District of Columbia.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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April 2005

Food Stamp Participation in April 2005 Nearly 1.5 Million Above April 2004 Level

April 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation dipped in April 2005 to 25,362,395, an over-the-month decline of 72,952, but an over-the-year increase of nearly 1.5 million people. Although the caseload has dropped in three of the first four months of 2005, Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in April 2005 was 8.49 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 45 of the last 52 months. Participation in April 2005 rose in the District of Columbia and 46 of the 50 states compared to a year earlier.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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March 2005

Food Stamp Participation Increased in March 2005

March 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation increased by 155,096 persons in March 2005 to 25,443,097 persons. This follows two consecutive monthly caseload declines and puts the over-the-year increase in Food Stamp Program participation to more than 1.6 million persons. Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in March 2005 was 8.56 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 45 of the last 51 months. Participation in March 2005 rose in the District of Columbia and 46 of the 50 states compared to a year earlier.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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February 2005

Food Stamp Participation in February 2005 Nearly 1.8 Million Above February 2004 Level

February 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation dipped in February 2005 to 25,272,657, an over-the-month decline of 189,230, but an over-the-year increase of nearly 1.8 million people. Although the February caseload drop follows on a drop in January, Food Stamp Program growth over the year reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in February 2005 was 8.39 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 44 of the last 50 months. Participation in February 2005 rose in the District of Columbia and 45 of the 50 states compared to a year earlier.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage” page. Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “Countercyclical Section” attachment.
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January 2005

Food Stamp Participation in January 2005 Nearly Two Million Above January 2004 Level

January 2005 participation data tables (pdf)

Food stamp participation dipped in January 2005 to 25,458,113, an over-the-month decline of 29,290, but an over-the-year increase of nearly two million people. The Food Stamp Program growth in recent months reflects continuing joblessness, state actions to improve access, and the effects of the food stamp reauthorization implementation.

The number of people participating in the Food Stamp Program in January 2005 was 8.58 million more persons than July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade.

Caseloads dropped through 1998 and 1999 as the economy improved and many states failed to get food stamps to low-income families who had left cash welfare for low-paid work. Caseloads then stabilized and began rising in 2000. Increases in participation since 2001 likely have been driven by improved access to the program in states, including most recently for legal immigrants, and by the weakened economy.

Participation has risen in 44 of the last 49 months. Participation in January 2005 fell in the District of Columbia and rose in 48 of the 50 states compared to a year earlier.

Nonetheless, research suggests that nearly half of all eligible people are not receiving food stamp benefits. See FRAC’s “Gaps in Coverage page” Fortunately, tools are available to bring federal food stamp dollars into families and communities, where each dollar is estimated to produce nearly two dollars in economic activity. See FRAC’s “countercyclical section attachment.”
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