2010 SNAP Data

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJune - JulyAugust - September - OctoberNovemberDecember


December 2010

44 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in December 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

December 2010 Participation Tables (pdf)

In December 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation rose to a record 44,082,324 people, an increase of 486,503 individuals from November 2010, and an increase of more than 5.1 million people compared with the prior December.

One in seven Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

Also in 2010, one in five Americans struggled with “food hardship,” according to FRAC analysis of data collected through the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between December 2009 and December 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Eight states registered over the year increases of 20 percent or higher: Utah (33.5%); Nevada (25.3%); Idaho (23.7%); New Jersey (22.8%); Florida (22.2%); Maryland (22.0%); Delaware (22.0%); and Rhode Island (20.5%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in December 2010 was 27.1 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.9 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


November 2010

43.5 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in November 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

November 2010 Participation Tables (pdf)

In November 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation rose to a record 43,595,794 people, an increase of 394,957 individuals from October 2010, and an increase of more than 5.4 million people compared with the prior November.

One in seven Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between November 2009 and November 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Nine states registered over the year increases of 20 percent or higher: ID (28.3%), NV (27%), DE (25.4%), UT (24.9%), FL (23.2%), MD (22.1%), NJ (22.1%), TX (21.6%), RI (21.4%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in November 2010 was 26.6 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.9 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


October 2010

43.2 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in October 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

October 2010 Participation Tables (pdf)

In October 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation rose to a record 43,200,878 people, an increase of 289,737 individuals from September 2010, and an increase of more than 5.5 million people compared with the prior October.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between October 2009 and October 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Ten states registered over the year increases of 20 percent or higher: ID (33.4%); NV (27.9%); RI (24%), FL (23.9%), UT (23.5%), NJ (23.3%), DE (22.8%), TX (22.6%), MD (20.8%), and CT (20.5%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in October 2010 was 26.3 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.9 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


September 2010

42.9 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in September 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

September 2010 Participation Tables (pdf)

In September 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 42,911,042 persons, an increase of 521,428 individuals from August 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6 million people compared with the prior September.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between September 2009 and September 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. 6 states experienced over-the-prior September percentage caseload increases above 25 percent: Idaho (39.1%); Nevada (28.7%); New Jersey (27.2%); Rhode Island (26.0%); Utah (25.9%); and Florida (25.8%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in September 2010 was 26 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.9 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.<


August 2010

42.3 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in August 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

August 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In August 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 42,389,619 persons, an increase of 553,379 individuals from July 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 6.1 million people compared with the prior August.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between August 2009 and August 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Seven states experienced over-the-prior August percentage caseload increases above 25 percent: Idaho (38.8%); Nevada (30.0%); Rhode Island (27.8%); New Jersey (26.6%); Florida (26.1%); Connecticut (25.5%); and Texas (25.2%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in August 2010 was 25.5 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.9 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


July 2010

41.8 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in July 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

July 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In July 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 41,836,330 persons, an increase of 560,873 individuals from June 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 6.2 million people compared with the prior August.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between July 2009 and July 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Nine states experienced over-the-prior July percentage caseload increases above 25 percent: Idaho (40.1%); Nevada (30.9%); Rhode Island (29.8%); Connecticut (29.1%); Utah (28.0%); New Jersey (27.5%); Florida (27.2%); New Hampshire (25.7%); and Texas (25.7%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in July 2010 was 25 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


June 2010

SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Nears 41.3 Million Americans in June 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

June 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In June 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 41,275,411 persons, an increase of 474,036 individuals from May 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6.4 million people compared with the prior June.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between June 2009 and June 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Five states experienced over-the-prior June percentage caseload increases above 30 percent: Idaho (39.4%); Rhode Island (34.7%); Utah (33.5%); Connecticut (33%); and Nevada (32.7%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in June 2010 was 24.9 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


May 2010

More Than 40.8 Million Americans Participated in SNAP/Food Stamps in May 2010

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

May 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In May 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 40,801,392 persons, an increase of 370,971 individuals from April 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6.4 million people compared with the prior May.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

State-by-State Trends

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between May 2009 and May 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Seven states experienced over-the-prior May percentage caseload increases above 30 percent: Idaho (40.4%); Rhode Island (37.7%); Nevada (35.1%); Utah (33.7%); Connecticut (33.6%); New Hampshire (32.9%); and Florida (30.9%).

Participation Gaps

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in May 2010 was 24 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2010 for more information.


April 2010

More Than 40.4 Million Americans Participated in SNAP/Food Stamps in April 2010

SNAP/Food Stamps Reach One in Eight Persons

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

April 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In April 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation set a new record: 40,430,614 persons, an increase of 320,761 individuals from March 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of nearly 6.7 million people compared with the prior April.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between April 2009 and April 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Eight states experienced over-the-prior April percentage caseload increases above 30 percent: Idaho (42.5%); Rhode Island (39.1%); Nevada (36.7%); Utah (34.7%); New Hampshire (34.1%); Florida (34.0%); Connecticut (33.3%); and Wyoming (30.3%).

April 2010 is the 13th month that the SNAP/Food Stamps benefit boost, which was included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamps households–for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The ARRA increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamps spending on local economies. Total spending for SNAP/Food Stamps benefits in April 2010 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to nearly $5.4 billion, bringing the estimate of the total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits to nearly $9.9 billion in April 2010. Since implementation of ARRA’s SNAP benefit boosts (April 2009 through April 2010), SNAP provided $65 billion in benefits for an estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits of $120 billion for that period.

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in April 2010 was 23.6 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2008 for more information.


SNAP/Food Stamps Served Record 40 Million Americans in March 2010

SNAP/Food Stamps Reach One in Eight Persons

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

March 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In March 2010, for the first time ever, SNAP/Food Stamps participation topped 40 million persons (40,157,395), an increase of 483,170 individuals from February 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of more than seven million people compared with the prior March.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between March 2009 and March 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Ten states experienced over-the-prior March percentage caseload increases above 30 percent: Idaho (42.5%); Nevada (41.7%); Rhode Island (41.6%); Utah (39.6%); Wyoming (38.6%); South Dakota (36.1%); Florida (35.9%); New Hampshire (35.7%); Wisconsin (34.2%); and Connecticut (32.6%).

March is the 12th month that the SNAP/Food Stamps benefit boost, which was included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamps households–for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The ARRA increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamps spending on local economies. Total spending for SNAP/Food Stamps benefits in March 2010 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to nearly $5.29 billion, bringing the estimate of the total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits to more than $9.73 billion in March 2010. During the first year of implementation of ARRA’s SNAP benefit boosts (April 2009 through March 2010), SNAP provided $59.7 billion in benefits for an estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits of $110 billion for that period.

Nonetheless, gaps in participation remain. One in three people eligible for SNAP goes unserved. Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in March 2010 was 23.3 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.

See Historic Trends: 1998 – 2008 for more information.


Nearly 39.7 Million Americans Received SNAP/Food Stamps in February 2010

SNAP/Food Stamps Reach One in Eight Persons

Record Enrollment Due to Economic Conditions, Outreach and Program Improvements

February 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In February 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation continued to break records, rising to 39,693,919 people, an increase of 262,929 individuals from January 2010, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 7.1 million people compared with the prior February.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between February 2009 and February 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Five states experienced over-the-prior February percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Nevada (45.5%); Idaho (44.4%), Utah (42.2%); Rhode Island (42%), and Wyoming (40.3%).

February is the 11th month that the SNAP/Food Stamps benefit boost, which was included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamps households–for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The ARRA increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamps spending on local economies. Total spending for SNAP/Food Stamps benefits in February 2010 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to nearly $5.29 billion, bringing the estimate of the total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits to more than $9.73 billion in February 2010.

Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in February 2010 was nearly 23 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.


SNAP/Food Stamps Participation in January 2010 Hits New Record: 39.4 Million Persons

One in Eight Americans Receives SNAP/Food Stamps

Recovery Act Boosts, Outreach Efforts and Smart Policy Choices Making Difference

January 2010 participation data tables (pdf)

In January 2010, SNAP/Food Stamps participation continued to break records, rising to 39,430,724 people, an increase of 452,214 individuals from December 2009, the prior record level, and an increase of more than 7.2 million people compared with the prior January.

Approximately one in eight Americans receives SNAP/Food Stamps. This is the highest share of the U.S. population on SNAP/Food Stamps.

Increases in SNAP/Food Stamps caseloads between January 2009 and January 2010 occurred in all parts of the country. Four states experienced over-the-prior January percentage caseload increases above 40 percent: Nevada (46.9%); Idaho (45.7%), Rhode Island (42.4%), and Wyoming (40%).

January is the tenth month that the SNAP/Food Stamps benefit boost, which was included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), took effect and bolstered the program’s stimulative effects for local economies. ARRA raised benefits for all SNAP/Food Stamps households–for example, $80 more per month for a household of four.

The ARRA increase in benefits also bolstered the stimulative effect of SNAP/Food Stamps spending on local economies. Total spending for SNAP/Food Stamps benefits in January 2010 due to ARRA raises, other improvements, and increased program participation rose to over $5.25 billion, bringing the estimated total economic stimulative impact of SNAP/Food Stamps benefits to nearly $9.67 billion in January 2010.

Implementing SNAP/Food Stamps policies that improve program access, ensuring staff capacity to process applications, and mounting outreach campaigns to get the word out to the public can help communities maximize the federal recovery dollars available to help local families and businesses.

Overall Trends

The number of people participating in SNAP/Food Stamps in January 2010 was more than 22 million more persons than in July 2000, when program participation nationally reached its lowest point in the last decade (16.8 million individuals). The program was renamed SNAP pursuant to the 2008 Farm Bill.