SNAP/Food Stamp Participation Data

2015

JanuaryFebruary


2014

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberNovemberDecember


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Nearly 500,000 People in February 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

February 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 45,682,474 persons in February 2015, a decrease of 346,456 persons compared with January 2015, and a decrease of 494,721 persons compared with February 2014.

State Trends

Between February 2014 and February 2015, 38 states experienced participation declines. In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements. In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline. In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 12 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, two (Nevada and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.

Economic Factors

Despite some improvements in economic conditions, food hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. In February 2015, about one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in nine were unemployed or underemployed, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis (pdf) using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

SNAP Still Misses Eligible People Experiencing Food Hardship

Despite growth in SNAP caseloads since the Great Recession, about one in five people eligible for SNAP are not served. SNAP policies that improve program access and increase staff capacity to process applications as well as SNAP outreach can help communities, families and businesses maximize federal dollars. Ensuring that all of those who are eligible for SNAP participate in the program is crucial as high rates of unemployment, underemployment, poverty, and food hardship plague millions in the U.S.

The Effect of SNAP on Participants and Communities

For struggling families, SNAP is making a huge difference on their economic well-being and health. An analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities finds that SNAP benefits, if counted as income, lifted 10.3 million Americans above the poverty line in 2012, including 4.9 million children. In addition, SNAP is good for local economies– each one dollar in federally funded SNAP benefits generates $1.79 in economic activity.

A Children’s HealthWatch brief (pdf) documents health improvements for young children who live in households that received increased SNAP benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Researchers compared samples of young children before and two years after the ARRA SNAP benefit increase. Following the increase, “children in families receiving SNAP were significantly more likely to be classified as ‘well’ than young children whose families were eligible but did not receive SNAP.” These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of SNAP as a mechanism to reduce poverty as well as improving the health and well-being of families and children across the U.S.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by More than 500,000 People in January 2015

SNAP Still Matters for Millions of People Across US

January 2015 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,029,343 persons in January 2015, a decrease of 222,731 persons compared with December 2014, and a decrease of 501,546 persons compared with January 2014.

State Trends

Between January 2014 and January 2015, 37 states experienced participation declines.  In many states, declines are associated with economic improvements.  In Maine and Massachusetts, however, new policies and procedures appear to be contributing to declines in caseloads that outpace the national decline.  In Massachusetts, emergency food providers and other advocates report that many client cases are being closed or denied without the state making an eligibility determination.

Of the 13 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, two (Nevada and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Continues to Decline with Over 530,000 Fewer Participants in December 2014

December 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,252,064 persons in December 2014, a decrease of 11,302 from November 2014. A larger decrease was seen over the year with 530,020 fewer persons participating, or 1.1 percent, from December 2013 to December 2014.

State Trends

Between December 2013 and December 2014, 37 states experienced participation declines. Of the 13 states and the District of Columbia with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, Hawaii, and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012).  In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans. Hawaii ranked fourth worst, missing nearly 4 of 10 eligible Hawaiians; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


November 2014 SNAP Over-the-Year Participation Declines by Over 760,000

November 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation was 46,271,508 persons in November 2014, a decrease of 206,170 from October 2014. A larger decrease was seen over the year with 764,136 fewer persons participating, or 1.6 percent, from November 2013 to November 2014.

State Trends

Between November 2013 and November 2014, 38 states and the District of Columbia experienced participation declines. Of the 12 states with over-the-year SNAP participation increases, three (Nevada, Hawaii, and California) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2012). In 2012 Nevada ranked third worst in reaching eligible SNAP people, missing nearly 4 in 10 eligible Nevadans. Hawaii ranked fourth worst, missing nearly 4 of 10 eligible Hawaiians; and California ranked second worst, missing 4 in 10 eligible Californians. Outreach and access initiatives in more recent years as well as economic and climate factors impacting need are contributing to those states’ increased participation levels.


SNAP Participation Drops By More Than 845,000 People Between September 2013 and September 2014

September 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in September 2014 was 46,459,998, a drop of 16,412 persons compared to the prior month, but a drop of 845,726 persons compared with September 2013.

State Trends

Between September 2013 and September 2014, ten states increased participation: Nevada, North Carolina, California, New Mexico, West Virginia, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, and Illinois. Four of those states (Nevada, California, New Jersey, and Hawaii) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data are available (2011).


August 2014 SNAP Caseloads Decrease Slightly Over Month, Down Over the Year

August 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

The August 2014 national SNAP participation level of 46,484,828 persons in August 2014 was a mere 2,060 person dip over the prior month but a decrease of 1,180,228 persons over August 2013.

State Trends

In August 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with August 2013 levels. Seven states increased participation between August 2013 and August 2014: California, Connecticut, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Two of those states (California and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


July 2014 SNAP Caseloads Remain Flat Over Month but Down Over the Year

July 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

An over-the-month decrease of 9,818 persons in the national SNAP participation level to 46,486,434 persons in July 2014 did not meaningfully change from June 2014. SNAP participation did decrease, however, by 1,151,034 persons from July 2013 to July 2014.

State Trends

In July 2014 the District of Columbia and 41 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with July 2013 levels. Nine states increased participation between July 2013 and July 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Hawaii, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Colorado, and New Mexico. Five of those states (California, Hawaii, Colorado, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


June 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down By More Than 1.2 Million People Over the Year

June 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

National SNAP participation in June 2014 was 46,496,145 persons, a drop of 1,264,102 persons compared with June 2013. While compared with May 2014, national SNAP participation level increased by 220,999 persons, that increase was concentrated heavily in North Carolina (which added 161,823 participants). Previously, for much of 2013 and 2014, North Carolina’s SNAP enrollment numbers had been depressed in connection with application and recertification processing delays.

State Trends

Compared with the prior June, 41 states and the District of Columbia registered drops in SNAP participation in June 2014.  Nine states bucked that trend and increased participation between June 2013 and June 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, Colorado, and Pennsylvania.  Five of those states (California, Hawaii, Colorado, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


May 2014 SNAP Caseloads Drop; 6th Consecutive Month Below 47 Million People

May 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in May 2014 dropped by 22,294 to 46,225,054 people; that represented a decrease of 1,410,172 people compared with May 2013. This is the sixth consecutive month that SNAP participation has averaged below 47 million people.

State Trends

In May 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with May 2013 levels. Seven states increased participation between May 2013 and May 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Three of those states (California, Hawaii, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


April 2014 SNAP Caseloads Down Over the Year

April 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

An over-the-month increase of 149,751 in the national SNAP participation level to 46,247,450 persons in April 2014 was driven by a one-month jump of 216,544 persons in North Carolina; but even with that development, national SNAP participation was still 1,301,127 persons lower in April 2014 than in April 2013. The April 2014 national SNAP participation level is lower than all but two months dating back to October 2011.

State Trends

North Carolina had experienced significant backlogs in processing SNAP applications in 2013 and early 2014, with some cases pending more than 90 days. USDA imposed a series of deadlines for North Carolina to clear the backlogs, with the final deadline set for March 31, 2014.

In April 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with April 2013 levels. Eight states increased participation between April 2013 and April 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Hawaii, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Four of those states (California, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Nevada) rank among the ten worst in reaching SNAP eligible people, according to the most recent year for which such data is available (2011).


March 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

March 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in March 2014 dropped to 46,097,719 persons, a decrease of 79,476 persons compared with February 2014 and a decrease of 1,626,877 persons compared with March 2013. The March participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to lower SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in March of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In March 2014 the District of Columbia and 42 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with March 2013 levels. Eight states, however, increased participation between March 2013 and March 2014: Nevada, Connecticut, California, West Virginia, Hawaii, New Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.


February 2014 SNAP Participation Drops to Lowest Level Since August 2011

February 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels.  Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014:  Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.


SNAP Caseloads Decrease in January 2014

January 2014 Participation Tables — 1-Month Change, 1-Year, 5-Year Change, and State-by-State Analysis (pdf)

SNAP participation in February 2014 dropped to 46,177,144 persons, a decrease of 353,785 persons compared with January 2014 and a decrease of 1,380,980 persons compared with February 2013. The February participation numbers are the lowest since August 2011 (45,794,474 persons).

Overall, economic improvements are expected to slow SNAP participation, but economic hardship and need for food assistance remain relatively high. About one in seven people in the U.S. received SNAP and about one in eight were unemployed or underemployed in February of 2014, according to USDA data and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. An analysis using the Healthways Well-Being survey collected by Gallup showed that nearly one in five people did not have enough money to feed themselves or their family in 2013.

State Trends

In February 2014 the District of Columbia and 43 states experienced drops in SNAP participation compared with February 2013 levels. Seven states, however, increased participation between February 2013 and February 2014: Nevada, California, West Virginia, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania.