FRAC History

FRAC Marks Forty Year Anniversary at Annual Dinner

Forty years ago, the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) opened its doors in New York City and began work to reduce and eventually end hunger in America. More...

2009-2010
FRAC leads efforts to broaden low-income children’s access to healthy school lunch and breakfast, summer and afterschool meals and child care food in the child nutrition reauthorization process.

FRAC launches FRAC Focuses: Obesity and Poverty, a unique e-periodical highlighting issues at the intersection of hunger, poverty and obesity in America.

2008-2009
FRAC and allies obtain substantial improvements in refundable child tax credit rules that provide billions of dollars in help to low-income working families with children.

FRAC launches anti-recession Web site www.realstimulus.org and leads effort that obtains $20 billion in food stamp improvements in economic recovery act.

2008
FRAC, state officials, elderly advocates and other anti-hunger allies secure more than $10 billion in 10-year added funding in the 2008 Farm Bill for food stamps (now renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP), including the first boost in the program’s minimum benefit in more than 30 years.

2007
Congress enacts FRAC initiative to reform the summer food program nationwide, cutting red tape and increasing reimbursements to reach more children.

FRAC opens second state office, Maryland Hunger Solutions, to combat hunger and improve nutrition in the state.

2006
FRAC and D.C. Hunger Solutions, along with Share Our Strength, launch ambitious Partnership to End Childhood Hunger in the Nation’s Capital.

FRAC issues School Wellness Policy and Practice: Meeting the Needs of Low-Income Students to focus benefits of the new federal wellness policy mandate on those most in need.

2005
FRAC and allies successfully stop deep budget cuts in food stamps and other nutrition programs supporting low-income people.

FRAC leads efforts at the state and local level to implement important 2004 child nutrition and 2002 food stamp reauthorization gains.

2004
FRAC, the Child Nutrition Forum and allies obtain a child nutrition reauthorization law that strengthens school breakfast and lunch, summer food, child care food and WIC programs.

2002
FRAC launches D.C. Hunger Solutions to combat hunger and improve nutrition in the District of Columbia.

FRAC launches weekly News Digest which becomes the basic news source for thousands of advocates and stakeholders around the country on developments in anti-hunger, anti-poverty, and related areas.

2001-2002
FRAC and anti-hunger and immigrant allies obtain further restoration of benefits for hundreds of thousands of legal immigrants, significantly improved access to benefits for working families, and other important improvements in the Food Stamp Reauthorization Act of 2002.

2001
FRAC helps lead anti-poverty and anti-hunger groups in obtaining tens of billions of dollars in refundable tax credits for low-income working families with children in federal tax legislation.

FRAC leads campaign securing passage of provisions of the Hunger Relief Act to make the Food Stamp Program more responsive to working families and other hungry Americans, and secures legislation strengthening the Child and Adult Care Food Program’s nutrition benefits in family child care and afterschool programs.

1999-2000
FRAC obtains federal, state, and local administrative initiatives in food stamps to reverse the caseload decline among eligible people and make the program accessible to low-income working families.

1998
FRAC joins other anti-hunger and immigrant groups in leading the successful drive to reverse a 1996 law and restore food stamp benefits to one-quarter of a million immigrant children, seniors, and refugees.

FRAC spearheads efforts that improve and expand afterschool food, school breakfast and other programs in the 1998 child nutrition reauthorization legislation.

1997
FRAC and national anti-hunger partners lead Hunger Has A Cure campaign, key pieces of which are included in the 1997 Balanced Budget Act.

USDA and the Census Bureau release the first-ever government study of the number of hungry Americans, using methodology adapted from FRAC’s Community Childhood Hunger Identification Project surveys.

1995-1996
FRAC provides key leadership in the successful struggle to preserve the entitlement status of federal nutrition programs under assault in Congress.

FRAC organizes a national coalition, Save Our Nation’s Nutrition Programs, endorsed by 500 organizations across the country.

1993
FRAC rallies support for important Food Stamp Program improvements in the Mickey Leland Childhood Hunger Relief Act, the most significant anti-hunger legislation since 1977.

1992
Release of FRAC’s School Breakfast Score Card brings nationwide attention to the fact that only one-third of the low-income children receiving school lunch also get school breakfast. The report’s release contributes to passage of state mandates requiring schools with a high proportion of low-income students to serve breakfast.

1991
FRAC launches the Campaign to End Childhood Hunger.

FRAC releases the most comprehensive nationwide study of childhood hunger ever conducted—the Community Childhood Hunger Identification Project—which estimates that one in eight children under the age of 12 in this country is hungry.

1990
FRAC marks 20 years of fighting hunger with its first annual dinner—honoring House Speaker Thomas Foley and Senate Republican Leader Bob Dole. Both express their commitment to ending domestic hunger and pay tribute to FRAC’s contributions to this cause.

1989
FRAC releases Feeding the Other Half, documenting the serious consequences of inadequate nutrition for low-income women, infants and children eligible for but not served by WIC. The report is instrumental in gaining a significant funding boost for WIC.

FRAC’s research and lobbying are central to the enactment of the Child Nutrition Amendments of 1989, which expand the availability of meals for low-income children in the summer and provide incentives for school breakfast expansion.

1987
FRAC’s Fuel for Excellence, a guide to the School Breakfast Program, is the launching pad for a multi-year National School Breakfast Expansion Campaign with 70 national partners.

1984
FRAC issues The Widening Gap—a report documenting the increasing disparity between black and white infant death rates in the United States. It focuses public attention on the relationship between infant mortality and poor nutrition among low-income mothers.

1981-82
FRAC’s policy analysis, testimony and leadership of the nationwide antihunger network play a key role in blunting the effect of proposals for massive cutbacks in nutrition programs.

1981
FRAC leads the way in publicizing a proposed USDA school lunch regulation that would reduce portion sizes and allow ketchup and pickle relish to be counted toward meeting vegetable requirements. “Ketchup as a vegetable” becomes a national issue, and FRAC coordinates a successful campaign to have the regulation withdrawn.

1978
Research and policy recommendations by FRAC play a key role in passage of the Child Nutrition Amendments of 1978, which greatly expand the WIC and School Breakfast Programs.

1977
FRAC’s research and field network play a crucial role in the adoption of the landmark Food Stamp Act of 1977, which improves access to the program for millions.

1976
FRAC wins a court order to release $35 million in funds impounded from the Elderly Feeding Program. The released funds are used to increase the number of people served.

1973
Litigation by FRAC leads to the release of funds impounded from the WIC program. This victory launches rapid growth in the program and WIC’s eventual nationwide reach.

FRAC wins two lawsuits in the United States Supreme Court that prevent exclusion of thousands of participants from the Food Stamp Program.

1970
FRAC is founded in New York City. FRAC pursues lawsuits in 26 states that ultimately lead to a requirement that every state must operate in all counties either a food stamp or a commodity distribution program to feed the poor.